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Hello, everyone! You might want to know more about Christmas. Thank you for visiting my blog! Christmas is my favorite holiday. In Argentina, the weather is almost always warm at Christmas. Preparations for Christmas begin very early in December and … Continue reading

The History of Cupcakes

Hi there! I decided to research about cupcakes because I was reading a fictional cupcake book. Hope you enjoy the cupcake facts!

The cupcake evolved in the United States in the 19th century, and it was revolutionary because of the amount of time it saved in the kitchen. There was a shift from weighing out ingredients when baking to measuring out ingredients. According to the Food Timeline Web, food historians have yet to pinpoint exactly where the name of the cupcake originated.

There are two theories: one, the cakes were originally cooked in cups and two, the ingredients used to make the cupcakes were measured out by the cup. In the beginning, cupcakes were sometimes called “number” cakes, because they were easy to remember by the measurements of ingredients it took to create them: One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, three cups of flour, four eggs, one cup of milk, and one spoonful of soda. Clearly, cupcakes today have expanded to a wide variety of ingredients, measurements, shapes, and decorations – but this was one of the first recipes for making what we know today as cupcakes.

Cupcakes were convenient because they cooked much quicker than larger cakes. When baking was down in hearth ovens, it would take a long time to bake a cake, and the final product would often be burned. Muffin tins, also called gem pans, were popular around the turn of the 20th century, so people started created cupcakes in tins.

Since their creation, cupcakes have become a pop culture trend in the culinary world. They have spawned dozens of bakeries devoted entirely to them. While chocolate and vanilla remain classic favorites, fancy flavors such as raspberry meringue and espresso fudge can be found on menus.

There are cookbooks, blogs, and magazines specifically dedicated to cupcakes. Icing, also called frosting in the United States, is a sweet often creamy glaze made of sugar with a liquid, such as water or milk, that is often enriched with ingredients such as butter, egg whites, cream cheese, or flavorings. It is used to cover or decorate baked goods.

Elizabeth Raffald documented the first recipe for icing in 1769 in the Experienced English Housekeeper, according to the Food Timeline. The simplest icing is a glace icing, containing powdered sugar and water. This can be flavored and colored as desired, for example, by using lemon juice in place of the water.

More complicated icings can be made by beating fat into powdered sugar (as in buttercream), by melting fat and sugar together, by using egg whites (as in royal icing), and by adding other ingredients such as glycerin (as in fondant). Some icings can be made from combinations of sugar and cream cheese or sour cream, or by using ground almonds (as in marzipan). The first mention of the cupcake can be traced as far back as 1796, when a recipe notation of “a cake to be baked in small cups” was written in American Cookery by Amelia Simmons.

The earliest documentation of the term cupcake was in ‘Seventy-five Receipts for Pastry, Cakes, and Sweetmeats’ in 1828 in Eliza Leslie’s Receipts cookbook. In the early 19th century, there were two different uses for the name cup cake or cupcake. In previous centuries, before muffin tins were widely available, the cakes were often baked in individual pottery cups, ramekins, or molds and took their name from the cups they were baked in.

This is the use of the name that has remained, and the name of “cupcake” is now given to any small cake that is about the size of a teacup. The name “fairy cake” is a fanciful description of its size, which would be appropriate for a party of diminutive fairies to share. While English fairy cakes vary in size more than American cupcakes, they are traditionally smaller and are rarely topped with elaborate icing.

The other kind of “cup cake” referred to a cake whose ingredients were measured by volume, using a standard-sized cup, instead of being weighed. Recipes whose ingredients were measured using a standard-sized cup could also be baked in cups; however, they were more commonly baked in tins as layers or loaves. In later years, when the use of volume measurements was firmly established in home kitchens, these recipes became known as 1234 cakes or quarter cakes, so called because they are made up of four ingredients: one cup of butter, two cups of sugar, three cups of flour, and four eggs.

They are plain yellow cakes, somewhat less rich and less expensive than pound cake, due to using about half as much butter and eggs compared to pound cake. The names of these two major classes of cakes were intended to signal the method to the baker; “cup cake” uses a volume measurement, and “pound cake” uses a weight measurement. Cupcakes have become more than a trend over the years, they’ve become an industry!

Paper baking cups first hit U.S. markets after the end of the World War II. An artillery manufacturer called the James River Corporation began manufacturing cupcake liners for U.S. markets when its military markets began to diminish. By 1969, they consolidated business as a paper company and left artillery manufacturing behind.

During the 1950s, the paper baking cup gained popularity as U.S. housewives purchased them for convenience. Their flexibility grew when bakers realized that they could bake muffins as well as cupcakes in the baking cups. The modern idea of the cupcake is probably different from the historical origin of the phrase.

Imagine what it would be like being a cook in 19th-century Britain or North America. When food historians approach the topic of cupcakes, they run into a gray area in which the practice of making individual cup-sized cakes can become confused with the convention of making cakes with cup-measured ingredients. The notion of baking small cakes in individual containers probably began with the use of clay or earthenware mugs.

It could have been a way to use up extra batter; to make the most efficient use of a hot oven by placing small ramekins, or little baking dishes, in unused spaces; or to create an evenly baked product fast when fuel was in short supply. Early in the 20th century, the advent of multi-cupcake molded tins brought modest mass production methods to cupcake making, and a modern baking tradition was born. Cakes in some form have been around since ancient times, and today’s familiar round cakes with frosting can be traced back to the 17th century, made possible by advances in food technology such as: better ovens, metal cake molds and pans, and the refinement of sugar.

I got it at storify.com but I originally got it at Google Images.

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Websites I used:

http://iml.jou.ufl.edu/projects/spring07/ayers/history.html

http://people.rit.edu/kge3737/320/project3/history.html

http://recipes.howstuffworks.com/food-facts/who-invented-the-cupcake.htm

http://inventors.about.com/od/cstartinventions/a/Who-Invented-The-Cupcake.htm

Books I Recommend: Waterbirds by David Chandler

Hi there! This is the 22nd book recommendation list.

1. Waterbirds by David Chandler
2. Eagles by Rebecca L. Grambo
3. The Fortune-Tellersby Lloyd Alexander
4. Arizonaby Mari Kesselring
5. Leprechaun Goldby Teresa Baterman
6. Thanksgiving All Aroundby Mike Berenstain
7. Miracles on Maple Hillby Virginia Sorensen
8. Esperanza Risingby Pam Muñoz Ryan
9. Hope the Happiness Fairyby Daisy Meadows
10. Cassidy the Costume Fairyby Daisy Meadows
11. Anya the Cuddly Creatures Fairyby Daisy Meadows
12. Elisa the Royal Adventure Fairyby Daisy Meadows
13. Lizzie the Sweet Treats Fairy: A Rainbow Magic Bookby Daisy Meadows
14. Maddie the Fun and Games Fairyby Daisy Meadows
15. Eva the Enchanted Ball Fairyby Daisy Meadows
16. Cinderella Stays Lateby Joan Holub & Suzanne Willams
17. Secret Admirerby Jane O’Conner
18. Tofu Quiltby Ching Yeung Russell
19. The Mystery Girlby Gertrude Warner Chandler
20. Dying to Meet Youby Kate Klise
21. Doggone It!by Nancy Krulik
22. Any Way You Slice Itby Nancy Krulik
23. Going Overboard!by Nancy Krulik
24. Fern the Green Fairyby Daisy Meadows
25. Fira and the Full Moonby Disney

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A Realistic World Beyond Your Eyes

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Illustration by Lillian Darnell – 2015

Hi there, everyone! Please note that the words are in English. You’re about to enter a realistic world that will pull you inside the realistic world which is called Cinnamon Extraordinary Planet.

“Mother, where are my cinnamon scented dresses?” asked a 10 cinnamon cakes old girl (which is 15 years old in earth years). “Campari, sorry but I just put them in a wet donut roll (a washer) and won’t be done until its dry.” answered Mother as she applied lipstick on her lips.

“Oh fine, do I have to wear cinnamon shirts?” asked Campari as she pouted around the cinnamon room.

“Oh, hi there! I didn’t see you come in! My name is Campari. My mother mentioned it earlier. My mother’s name is Sweet Cinnamon Dazzle although she likes going by SCD or Mother. I have a father who works at a cinnamon factory and I hardly see him but I do know his name which is Twisty Spice Herb and he also likes to go by TSH or Father. My best friend is Splendid Apple Cinnamon. She likes going by her full name.” explained Campari Dazzle as she looked at her mother with a cinnamon? look.
“So you must be a world visitor. Campari told me about you. Nice to meet you!” said Mother as she looked at the reader.

“Campari has a cinnamon dance to go to tonight and is very excited to be going there.” said Mother in a jokingly way.

So Campari got ready for the dance and she saw Sherbet waiting for her so she said,”Goodbye, Mother!” so fast that her mother didn’t get to tell her,”Have fun!” and so the dancing partners headed to the dance.

When they got there, they danced until midnight to get some cinnamon rolls. After that, they danced some more. They danced out onto the cinnamon scented balcony in the moonlight and kissed briefly. Shortly after that, they went inside and left the dance.

“Mother, I had the most wonderful time at the dance.” said Campari dreamily. “Well, that’s great!” said Mother. Then they both went to sleep.

The next morning, Campari said,”I’m in love,” and her mother said,”Who are you in love with?” and she responded,”Sherbet.”Do you want to get married yet?” said Mother.

“Mother, I want to have dates with him first”. So the couple set out on several dates a few days later. Just a month after, Sherbert asked,”Will you marry me, my cinnamon bun?” and of course she couldn’t say no so she said,”Yes, I’ll marry you!” and then they went out to find Campari’s mother.

“Oh, Campari! You must be Sherbert! You came to tell me you want a wedding”. So shortly after, the wedding begins and all Sherbert and Campari’s families and friends came. And they lived happily ever after.

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Books I Recommend: Home Sweet Home by Elizabeth Doyle Carey

Hi there, everyone! Here’s the 5th recommendation list! Enjoy!

1. Home Sweet Home by Elizabeth Doyle Carey
2. Fantasy Encyclopedia by Judy Allen
3. The Goblin Baby by Berlie Doherty
4. The Magic Key by Emily Rodda
5. Daughter of Venice by Donna Jo Napoli
6. The Peskie Spell by Emily Rodda
7. The Magic Paintbrush by Laurence Yep
8. The Charm Bracelet by Emily Rodda

(amazon affiliate links above)

Books I Recommend: Best Friends Forever! by Sarah Mlynowski

Hi there! I hope you like these!!! Here’s the 3rd reccommendation list.

1. Best Friends Forever! by Sarah Mlynowski
2. Sunny Sweet Is So Not Sorry by Jennifer Ann Mann
3. The Time of the Fireflies by Kimberly Griffiths Little
4. When the Butterflies Came by Kimberly Griffiths Little
5. Heart of Stone by M.L. Welsh
6. The Star Maker by Laurence Yep