Lisa and The Huge Storm

Hey, everyone! You are about to enter a huge mystery story. Anyway, here are some related stories: http://lilliandarnell.com/2019/11/03/an-incredible-day/, http://lilliandarnell.com/2019/07/17/adventures-of-marigold-springs/, and http://lilliandarnell.com/2019/06/16/peaceful-summer/. I hope you enjoy!

Once many years ago, there lived a girl whose name was Lisa. Lisa lived with her parents in a huge castle. Her parents were Leah and Andy. Lisa loved having fun. They lived happily in the castle.

But one day, a huge storm came and damaged their spring water moat. At that point, everything changed. Lisa no longer had time to have fun. And Lisa never saw her parents as they were often fixing damage around the castle.

But one day, everything changed as Lisa grew up. Lisa started working on their castle repairs. Lisa looked at repairing the castle as fun. And the best part was she got to see her parents all the time again.

After several years had passed. Lisa and her parents finally finished repairing their castle. And they moved on to investigating the storm now so long ago. They were able to figure out that it was not Mother Nature causing the storm.

Lisa figured out that it was an evil witch all on her own. So they moved on to figure out how to confront the evil witch. Lisa and her family figured that out by secretly putting a tracker on the witch’s broom.

So for a long time, they tracked the evil witch until they found her little cottage. Surprisingly, the cottage was cute and not evil looking. So Lisa and her parents headed to the witch’s cottage.

WHen Lisa and her family arrived, the evil witch was waiting outside for them. The witch apologized and said, “I am really a sorceress and I didn’t mean to make such a storm.”

The sorceress gestured to her garden and continued speaking, “These flowers would’ve died if I hadn’t given them the moisture they needed.” Lisa, Leah, and Andy all huddled together to speak privately

“The witch seems like she’s telling the truth. But what can we do to help?,” said Lisa cautiously. Leah & Andy said,”I think you are right. Let’s give her and her plants a room  and greenhouse in the castle.”

Lisa nodded and said, “That sounds like a great plan to me”. Lisa, Leah, and Andy walked over to the sorceress and Lisa sad, “Me and my family decided to let your plants stay in our royal greenhouse.”

Lisa pauses for dramatic effect and continues talking, “We’ve also decided to let you stay in the castle with us. We could use a sorceress. Don’t worry though, you can come back here anytime. Also one more thing I forgot to ask what’s your name?”

The sorceress smiled and said, “Thank you, Your Highness. I am Sorceress Brianna but please just call me Brianna or Bree.” Lisa grins and says, “It’s nice to meet you Bree. Oh by the way, you don’t have to say any royal titles to me and my family you can call me Lisa.”

The sorceress said, “I am honored, Lisa. ” And so from that day forward Princess Lisa’s castle and kingdom stayed pristine and undamaged. Princess Lisa and her family had much more fun for years to come.

That’s the end of the story. I hope you enjoyed!

Two butterflies resting on lavender.

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Hello, everyone! You might want to know more about Christmas. Thank you for visiting my blog! Christmas is my favorite holiday. In Argentina, the weather is almost always warm at Christmas. Preparations for Christmas begin very early in December and … Continue reading

Nature: Research for Carnations

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Hi there! Camilla has let me pick my own assignment. I chose a flower. I would have done more flowers but Camilla said to choose only one flower. So I chose carnation.

The single flowers of the Carnations species, Dianthus caryophyllus (that’s the scientific name) has 5 petals and they can vary from white to pink to purple in colors. Border Carnation cultivars may have double flowers with 1 to 40 petals. When they grow in gardens, Carnations grow to between 6 and 8.5 cm in diameter. Petals on Carnations are generally clawed or serrated.

Carnations are bisexual flowers and bloom simply or in a branched or forked cluster. The stamens on Carnations can occur in one or two whorls, in equal number or twice the number of the petals. The Carnation leaves are narrow and stalk less and their color varies from green to grey-blue or purple. Carnations grow big, full blooms on strong, straight stems. The carnation’s history dates back to ancient Greek and Roman times, when it was used in art and decor.

Christians or some spirituals believe that the first carnation bloomed on earth when Mary wept for Jesus as he carried his cross. Carnations in these early times were predominantly found in shades of pale pink and peach, but over the years the palette of available colors has grown to include red, yellow, white, purple, and even green. Throughout so many centuries of change, the popularity of the carnation has remained undiminished. The fact that the carnation continues to endure is a testament to its vast appeal.

The meanings of carnations include fascination, distinction, and love. Like many other flowers, different messages can also be expressed with the flower’s different color varieties. Light red carnations, for example, are often used to convey admiration, whereas the dark red version expresses deeper sentiments of love and affection. White carnations are associated with purity and luck, and pink carnations are often given as a sign of gratitude.

In the early part of the 20th century, carnations became the official flower of Mother’s Day in addition finding particular significance in many other cultures worldwide. To this day, carnations remain a favorite flower choice for many different occasions. They are immediately recognizable flowers, and they possess a charm and allure that continues to captivate people around the globe. In fact, in many parts of the world, the popularity of carnations surpasses that of any other flower including roses.

The powerful sentiments these flowers can express are a perfect complement to their classic beauty and long-lasting freshness. Carnation is a flowering plant that belongs to the family Caryophyllaceae. There are over 300 varieties of carnations that can be found throughout the world. These plants originate from Europe and Asia.

Carnations are cultivated at least 2000 years because of their beautiful flowers and intense fragrance. Carnations require well drained soil, enough moisture and direct sunlight for successful growth. These flowers are symbol of labor movement and mother’s love in the most countries of the world. Some people in France believe that carnations symbolize bad luck, where they are used mostly for the preparation of funeral bouquets. Carnation is a herbaceous plant that can reach 31 inches in height.

Carnation has 6 inches long slender leaves. They are usually grayish or bluish green in color and covered with waxy substance. White carnations will change its color after adding food coloring to the water. The flower will change its color after 24 hours.

Dianthus is Latin which for “flower of the gods”. White carnations are inevitable part of wedding bouquets and bouquets prepared for the first wedding anniversary. Carnations are birth flowers for all people that are born in January. These flowers are often used as decoration for tuxedoes.

Bouquets made of pink carnations are traditionally prepared for Mother’s day. Colombia is the greatest producer of carnations in the world. Carnations are national flowers of countries such as Monaco, Spain, Slovenia and Ohio. They are also used as a symbol of different fraternities and sororities.

Carnations can propagate via seeds and plant cuttings. Carnations are perennial plants, which mean that they can live more than 2 years. Carnations also have long lifespan in the vase – they can remain fresh up to 14 days after removal from the ground.

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This is the website I got the image from even though I found it on Google Images: http://www.list-of-birthstones.com/birth%20flowers/Pictures%20of%20birth%20flowers/carnation%20flower.jpg

Sources I Used:

http://www.theflowerexpert.com/content/mostpopularflowers/carnations

http://www.proflowers.com/blog/history-and-meaning-of-carnations

http://www.softschools.com/facts/plants/carnation_facts/637/

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