Wonderful Book Enchantment: Starfields by Carolyn Marsden

Hey, everyone! This is my 58th book recommendation.  Also, in case you’re wondering the blue links, are Amazon affiliates. Here are some other book recommendation blog posts: http://lilliandarnell.com/2017/08/10/wonderful-book-enchantment-georges-marvelous-medicine-by-ronald-dahl/http://lilliandarnell.com/2016/10/25/books-i-recommend-frozen-by-sarah-nathan-and-sela-roman/, and http://lilliandarnell.com/2016/06/14/books-i-recommend-the-curious-garden-by-peter-brown/. I hope you enjoy!

1. A Simple Case of Angels by Caroline Adderson

2. The Worst Witch Saves The Day by Jill Murphy

3. Race to the South Pole by Kate Messner

4. At War, 1944 by Mary Pope Osborne

5. Fantastic Mr. Fox by Roald Dahl

6. Pocket Guide to the Outdoors by Jean Craighead George

7. A Complicated Case by Ulf Nilsson

8. Titanic by Deborah Hopkinson

9. Tree Castle Island by Jean Craighead George

10. Ancient Egyptians by Laura Buller

11. India the Moonstone Fairy by Daisy Meadows

12. Ellie Featherbill All Alone by Daisy Meadows

13. Jessica the Jazz Fairy by Daisy Meadows

14. Cherry the Cake Fairy by Daisy Meadows

15. Rescue on the Oregon Trail by Kate Messner

16. The Song of the Whales by Uri Orlev

17. Kindred Souls by Patricia MacLachlan

18. The Truth of Me by Patricia MacLachlan

19. White Fur Flying by Patricia MacLachlan

20. Starfields by Carolyn Marsden

21. Fish Talk by Suzanne Francis

22. Wish by Barbara O’Connor

23. Calico Girl by Jerdine Nolen

24. Lily the Rainforest Fairy by Daisy Meadows

25. Sky Sailors by David L. Bristow

26. The Boys In The Boat by Daniel James Brown

27. Wishes and Wings by Kathleen Duey

28. The Fourth Journey Through Time by Geronimo Stilton

29. James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl

30. The Magic Finger by Roald Dahl

31. A Girl from Yamhill by Beverly Cleary

32. Free In The Skies by Robert Burleigh

33. Cross Stitch Fairies by Claire Crompton, Maria Diaz, Joan Elliott, Lucie Heaton, and Lesley Teare

34. A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle

35. Who Was George Washington Carver? by Jim Gigliotti

36. Destiny the Rock Star Fairy by Daisy Meadows

37. Me And Marvin Gardens by Amy Sarig King

38. Counting Sheep by Jacqueline Kelly

39. The Mystery Horse by Gertrude Chandler Warner

40. Henry Ford by Hazel B. Aird and Catherine Ruddiman

41. One Step at a Time by Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch

42. The Metropolitans by Carol Goodman

43. Man Of Peace by Willam Meyers

44. Maggie and the Wish Fish by E.D. Baker

45. Louisa May Alcott by Cary Ryan

46. Eat My Dust! by Monica Kulling

47. Earth From Above by Robert Burleigh Farmer

48. Farmer George Plants a Nation by Peggy Thomas

49. Judy Blume by Kathleen Krull

50. Drowned City by Don Brown

51. Fireflies by Sally M. Walker

52. Dream Weaver by Jonathan London

53. The Long Winter by Laura Ingalls Wilder

54. Lucy the Diamond Fairy by Daisy Meadows

55. Cheryl the Christmas Fairy by Daisy Meadows

56. Man on a Mission by David Hilmers and Rick Houston

57. Keira the Movie Star Fairy by Daisy Meadows

58. Libby the Writing Fairy by Daisy Meadows

59. Collision Course by Gordon Korman

60. Irish Red by Jim Kjelgaard

61. Castle Avamir by Kathleen Duey

62. Melodie the Music Fairy by Daisy Meadows

63. Knit-Knotters by Sam Hay

64. Lindsay the Luck Fairy by Daisy Meadows

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Tweet Hello, everyone! You might want to know more about Christmas. Thank you for visiting my blog! Christmas is my favorite holiday. In Argentina, the weather is almost always warm at Christmas. Preparations for Christmas begin very early in December … Continue reading

The History of Cupcakes

Hi there! I decided to research about cupcakes because I was reading a fictional cupcake book. Hope you enjoy the cupcake facts!

The cupcake evolved in the United States in the 19th century, and it was revolutionary because of the amount of time it saved in the kitchen. There was a shift from weighing out ingredients when baking to measuring out ingredients. According to the Food Timeline Web, food historians have yet to pinpoint exactly where the name of the cupcake originated.

There are two theories: one, the cakes were originally cooked in cups and two, the ingredients used to make the cupcakes were measured out by the cup. In the beginning, cupcakes were sometimes called “number” cakes, because they were easy to remember by the measurements of ingredients it took to create them: One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, three cups of flour, four eggs, one cup of milk, and one spoonful of soda. Clearly, cupcakes today have expanded to a wide variety of ingredients, measurements, shapes, and decorations – but this was one of the first recipes for making what we know today as cupcakes.

Cupcakes were convenient because they cooked much quicker than larger cakes. When baking was down in hearth ovens, it would take a long time to bake a cake, and the final product would often be burned. Muffin tins, also called gem pans, were popular around the turn of the 20th century, so people started created cupcakes in tins.

Since their creation, cupcakes have become a pop culture trend in the culinary world. They have spawned dozens of bakeries devoted entirely to them. While chocolate and vanilla remain classic favorites, fancy flavors such as raspberry meringue and espresso fudge can be found on menus.

There are cookbooks, blogs, and magazines specifically dedicated to cupcakes. Icing, also called frosting in the United States, is a sweet often creamy glaze made of sugar with a liquid, such as water or milk, that is often enriched with ingredients such as butter, egg whites, cream cheese, or flavorings. It is used to cover or decorate baked goods.

Elizabeth Raffald documented the first recipe for icing in 1769 in the Experienced English Housekeeper, according to the Food Timeline. The simplest icing is a glace icing, containing powdered sugar and water. This can be flavored and colored as desired, for example, by using lemon juice in place of the water.

More complicated icings can be made by beating fat into powdered sugar (as in buttercream), by melting fat and sugar together, by using egg whites (as in royal icing), and by adding other ingredients such as glycerin (as in fondant). Some icings can be made from combinations of sugar and cream cheese or sour cream, or by using ground almonds (as in marzipan). The first mention of the cupcake can be traced as far back as 1796, when a recipe notation of “a cake to be baked in small cups” was written in American Cookery by Amelia Simmons.

The earliest documentation of the term cupcake was in ‘Seventy-five Receipts for Pastry, Cakes, and Sweetmeats’ in 1828 in Eliza Leslie’s Receipts cookbook. In the early 19th century, there were two different uses for the name cup cake or cupcake. In previous centuries, before muffin tins were widely available, the cakes were often baked in individual pottery cups, ramekins, or molds and took their name from the cups they were baked in.

This is the use of the name that has remained, and the name of “cupcake” is now given to any small cake that is about the size of a teacup. The name “fairy cake” is a fanciful description of its size, which would be appropriate for a party of diminutive fairies to share. While English fairy cakes vary in size more than American cupcakes, they are traditionally smaller and are rarely topped with elaborate icing.

The other kind of “cup cake” referred to a cake whose ingredients were measured by volume, using a standard-sized cup, instead of being weighed. Recipes whose ingredients were measured using a standard-sized cup could also be baked in cups; however, they were more commonly baked in tins as layers or loaves. In later years, when the use of volume measurements was firmly established in home kitchens, these recipes became known as 1234 cakes or quarter cakes, so called because they are made up of four ingredients: one cup of butter, two cups of sugar, three cups of flour, and four eggs.

They are plain yellow cakes, somewhat less rich and less expensive than pound cake, due to using about half as much butter and eggs compared to pound cake. The names of these two major classes of cakes were intended to signal the method to the baker; “cup cake” uses a volume measurement, and “pound cake” uses a weight measurement. Cupcakes have become more than a trend over the years, they’ve become an industry!

Paper baking cups first hit U.S. markets after the end of the World War II. An artillery manufacturer called the James River Corporation began manufacturing cupcake liners for U.S. markets when its military markets began to diminish. By 1969, they consolidated business as a paper company and left artillery manufacturing behind.

During the 1950s, the paper baking cup gained popularity as U.S. housewives purchased them for convenience. Their flexibility grew when bakers realized that they could bake muffins as well as cupcakes in the baking cups. The modern idea of the cupcake is probably different from the historical origin of the phrase.

Imagine what it would be like being a cook in 19th-century Britain or North America. When food historians approach the topic of cupcakes, they run into a gray area in which the practice of making individual cup-sized cakes can become confused with the convention of making cakes with cup-measured ingredients. The notion of baking small cakes in individual containers probably began with the use of clay or earthenware mugs.

It could have been a way to use up extra batter; to make the most efficient use of a hot oven by placing small ramekins, or little baking dishes, in unused spaces; or to create an evenly baked product fast when fuel was in short supply. Early in the 20th century, the advent of multi-cupcake molded tins brought modest mass production methods to cupcake making, and a modern baking tradition was born. Cakes in some form have been around since ancient times, and today’s familiar round cakes with frosting can be traced back to the 17th century, made possible by advances in food technology such as: better ovens, metal cake molds and pans, and the refinement of sugar.

I got it at storify.com but I originally got it at Google Images.

image

Websites I used:

http://iml.jou.ufl.edu/projects/spring07/ayers/history.html

http://people.rit.edu/kge3737/320/project3/history.html

http://recipes.howstuffworks.com/food-facts/who-invented-the-cupcake.htm

http://inventors.about.com/od/cstartinventions/a/Who-Invented-The-Cupcake.htm

Books I Recommend: The Trolls by Polly Horvath

Hi there! This is the 23rd book recommendation list. I truly appreciate  everyone excluding strangers. I know that this is a lot of books to look through but you can take your time if needed. Thanks so much!

1. The Trollsby Polly Horvath
2. Hamster Magicby Lynne Jonell
3. Farmer Boyby Laura Ingalls Wilder
4.Gifts from the Seaby Natalie Kinsley-Warnock
5.Addy’s Little Brotherby Connie Porter
6. Honey Cakeby Joan Betty Stuchner
7. My Life as a Bookby Janet Tashjian
8. Oh, The Places He Wentby Maryann N. Weich
9. Saigeby Jessie Hass
10. Iridessa, Lost at Seaby Disney
11. Myka Finds Her Wayby Disney
12. Man Tripby Graham Salisbury
13. Trouble Magnetby Graham Salisbury
14. Thea Stilton and the Star Castawaysby Geronimo Stilton
15. The Canoe Trip Mysteryby Gertrude Chandler Warner
16. May Blossom of Britanniaby Anna Kirwan
17. The Girl Who Chased the Moonby Sarah Addison Allen
18. Secrets At Seaby Richard Peck
19. The Teacher’s Funeralby Richard Peck
20. Soupby Robert Newton Peck
21. On Pins and Needlesby Chloe Taylor
22. The Bus Station Mysteryby Gertrude Chandler Warner
23. The Friendshipby Mildred D. Taylor
24. Breathing Roomby Marsha Hayles
25. Clover Twig and the Magical Cottageby Kaye Umansky
26. Clover Twig and the Magical Cottageby Pam Muñoz Ryan

(Amazon affiliates)

Books I Recommend: Willowood by Cecilia Galente

Hi there! This is the 16th book recommendation list!

1. Willowoodby Cecilia Galente
2. The Magic Cake Shopby Meilea Hashimoto
3. Have Wheels, Will Travelby Anne Mazer
4. Water Balloonby Audrey Vernick
5. Recipes for Art and Craft Materialsby Helen Roney Sattler
6. The Summer of Mayby Cecilia Galente
7. Pocahontasby Joseph Bruchac
8. Darkbeastby Morgan Keyes
9. The Wishby Gail Carson Levine
10. Rosetta’s Daring Dayby Disney
11. The Agony of Aliceby Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
12. Dragon’s Breathby E.D. Baker
13. Shadows & Moonshineby Joan Aiken
14. Ida B.by Kate Hannigan
15. The First Two Lives of Lukas-Kashaby Lloyd Alexander
16. Gypsy Rizkaby Lloyd Alexander
17. Snapby Alison McGhee
18. Dolphins and Porpoisesby Stuart A. Kallen
19. Experiments with Rocks and Mineralsby Carol Hand
20. The Magic School Bus on the Ocean Floorby Joanna Cole

(amazon affilates above)