Annual Chromosome 18p- Conference 2017

Hey, everyone! This blog post is a summary of what I did at the Chromosome 18p- conference. I hope you enjoy reading this blog post. In case you’re wondering, the links are Thomas’, Camilla’s, Team TLC’s blogs, and Chromosome 18’s website.

July 11th, 2017: 

2017 Chromosome 18 Conference 7.10.17 #3

Borrowed from Camilla                                                         On the airplane waiting to take off.

 

We woke up early that morning to get to the airport and go through security. I went up the stairs to get to the flights while Camilla and Thomas went up the escalator. We got on the airplane right on time thankfully. Sadly, one of the plane engines wouldn’t start. We got to see a beautiful sunrise while we were sitting on the plane waiting for them to fix the plane engine. After the beautiful sunrise, the plane lifted off the ground.

We sat on the plane for about 3 ½ hours and watched clouds. I played a few offline games on my tablet.  I also finished a Hawaiian magazine while on the plane. I got Fritos® chips and honey roasted peanuts which I ate along with honey roasted cashews, apricots, and cereal. To go with that snack, I got some apple juice and water which I drank during the flight.

I also tried to see Lake Michigan when we were about to land but it was too cloudy for that. When we got off the plane in Chicago Midway International Airport, we walked to an elevator and got off on the ground level of the airport.

2017 Chromosome 18 Conference 7.10.17 #5

Waiting for our hotel room.                                Borrowed from Camilla

Camilla found our luggage and then we used a Lyft taxi to get us to Naperville’s Chicago Marriott where we met a few 18q and 18p- friends in the lobby while waiting to get a hotel room. Once we went up to our hotel room, we started unpacking and ate our lunch/snack that Camilla got us from The Artisan Table (the restaurant that’s in the hotel).

After settling in, I went down to the lobby with Thomas to see if any of my 18p- and 18q- friends were there. Camilla came down a little after I went up to tell her that it was almost dinner time. Camilla ran into several of her friends. I ran into a lot of friends at that time including Katie Baker. We took the Marriot shuttle down to Downtown Naperville to have dinner at an Irish pub named Quigley’s.

Once we got back from Quigley’s, I went up to the hotel room to put some things away. After that, I got a little lost trying to find the pool so I sat down and texted Camilla to find out. Although that wasn’t much help, I found the pool much to my luck. Just out the window, I could see a thunderstorm forming.

After we were done checking out the pool, Camilla and I sat on the hotel’s deck outside the hotel’s main entrances when it starting raining. After a few hours sitting there, we headed up to the room to get ready to go to bed.  I also let Macy Miller (a 18p- friend of mine) know that I was at the hotel and going to bed.

July 12th, 2017:

I woke up around 8:00 am and wondered where I was for a second. I remembered shortly after 2 seconds that I was in Naperville.  I wondered where Camilla was. So I messaged Camilla where she was and she had been out on the hotel deck and was right outside hotel room door. I accidentally woke Thomas up while I took a quick bath and watched a thunderstorm while messaging Macy.

I found out that Macy was already in Indiana. After the storm blew away, I prepared to go down to the lobby to see if any friends were there. I managed to catch Rebecca Parker on the elevator. We ate lunch at the Artisan Table. I went up to the room to relax some and check updates from Macy before going down with Camilla to run a quick trip to the bank.

When we got back, we ran into Macy and her family. I went up to the room to relax for a second before heading straight down to the lobby to hang out with Macy.  I hung out with Macy a little more before going with her parents to get registered and shortly, Camilla and I went in to get name tags and hung out with Macy when she came out of the registry room. I stayed down in the lobby with Macy until right before dinner when I went up the elevator to get my sunglasses and quickly went back down to Macy, her family, Camilla, and Thomas.

2017 Chromosome 18 Conference 7.12.17 #8

Macy & I                                                                                                                                        Borrowed from Camilla

Gorgeous clouds in Naperville.                                                                                                                                                                                Taken by me

We went out to dinner with Macy and her family at Bricks Wood Fired Pizza. We saw Katie Baker and Rebecca Parker there as well. We spent an hour there waiting for everyone to finish eating including myself.  Once we got back, we went back in the registry room for the silent auction. After the silent auction was over, I hung out with Macy in the registry room.

Macy wanted to know where the pool was so she could go swimming. So Macy got her parents’ permission so I could show Macy where the pool was. As Macy and I headed out of the registry room, we ran into some of Camilla’s friends. I helped Macy make friends while we walked to the pool entrance.

Once I showed Macy the pool, we headed back to the registry room so Macy could get permission to go swimming. Macy and I went to our hotel rooms to get our swimsuits on. I was one second late but I made it on time.

After Macy soaked her feet a little and dried off, she went up to her hotel room with her parents. I was drying off when she said good night to me. I went outside on the hotel deck with Camilla after drying off. After being outside for an hour, I went up to our hotel room to get ready for bed and go to sleep.

July 13th, 2017:

When I woke up, I once again wondered where Camilla was. This time, she had stayed on the hotel deck outside. I went down to her and I sat in an outdoor chair for 3 to 4 hours before going up to the room again until lunch.

2017 Chromosome 18 Conference 7.13.17 #9

Thomas with friends                                                                                                              Borrowed from Camilla

The registry served lunch and after I finished eating, I hung out with Macy for a half hour until Macy went out for bowling and pizza.  After that, I hung around with some friends didn’t want to go. Camilla and I also had a quick walk around the outside of the hotel. I also hung out at the pool.

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Me with flowers                       Borrowed from Camilla

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Me again with same flowers.                                     Borrowed from Camilla

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Me and Camilla with a few of the same flowers.                               Borrowed from Camilla

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A beautiful flower.                    Borrowed from Camilla

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A beautiful flower.                     Borrowed from Camilla

Macy had already gone to bed by the time I came out of the pool. I went to sleep shortly after midnight.

July 14th, 2017:

2017 Chromosome 18 Conference 7.14.17 #12

Camilla with a friend’s dog.                                            Taken by a friends’ sister.

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Me with Camilla’s friend. Borrowed from Camilla

I woke up and went down to the lobby to sit out on the hotel deck before it got too warm out. After I sat out there, I went up to the room to get 2 books to read on the couch before checking the time to wait for Macy. The registry provided/served lunch again.

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Thomas playing the piano with his friends.                                                                               Taken by Camilla’s friend

2017 Chromosome 18 Conference 7.14.17 #13

Thomas with his friend and me with Macy.                                                                   Borrowed from Camilla

After lunch, I hung out with Macy a little before she went to the self-advocate room.  I kept reading until Macy came back out and we hung out. We also went out to dinner at Jason’s Deli. After dinner, I hung out with Macy and her father. I also watched them play Monopoly Deal.

2017 Chromosome 18 Conference 7.14.17 #11

Thomas in the Jacuzzi                                                                                                                                                          Borrowed from Camilla

2017 Chromosome 18 Conference 7.14.17 #22

Me with a few friends.                                              Taken by Camilla’s friend

Rebecca came by and wanted to play Monopoly Deal. I sat there for 3 straight hours before pointing out the time. So I went up to the room to get ready for bed and go to sleep.

July 15th, 2017:

2017 Chromosome 18 Conference 7.15.17 #23

Me and some friends.                                                                                                                   Taken by Camilla’s friend

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Me, a friend, Camilla, and Chris Ulmer.                                                                                   Taken by a friend

2017 Chromosome 18 Conference 7.15.17 #26

Me with Chris Ulmer.                                                                                                                    Taken by Camilla

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Camilla with a few of her friends.                                   Taken by Camilla’s friend

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Camilla with one of her friends.                                     Taken by Camilla’s friend

2017 Chromosome 18 Conference 7.15.17 #32

18p- Group Picture.                                                                                                                                  Not sure who took the photo

I slept in late but managed to get down to the lobby before lunch. Again we went with Macy and her family to Jason’s Deli. After lunch, we separated ways for a little bit. During that time, I met Chris Ulmer and he interviewed me. Shortly after that interview, Camilla and I went up to the room to get ready for the group picture and the dance with the dinner. Camilla didn’t have time to style my hair before the group picture. I accidentally put on a too tight dress but didn’t have time to change into a more comfortable dress. After the group picture, Camilla and I went up to the hotel room so I could change into a more comfortable dress. Camilla styled my hair to look pretty. After I finished getting ready, I headed down to the lobby to see if Macy was there. I was about to get back on the elevator to ride up to go to the restroom when Macy got off the elevator and I made the decision to go to the closest restroom in the lobby instead. Macy and I chatted for a few minutes.

2017 Chromosome 18 Conference 7.15.17 #33

Macy and I.                                                                             Borrowed from Camilla

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Macy and I.                                         Taken by Camilla’s friend

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Me, Macy, and a friend.                                               Taken by Camilla’s friend

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Camilla with a few friends.                                             Taken by a friend.

2017 Chromosome 18 Conference 7.15.17 #30

Me with one of Camilla’s friends.                            Taken by Camilla’s friend

2017 Chromosome 18 Conference 7.15.17 #37

Camilla with a friend.                                                                                                               Taken by a friend

2017 Chromosome 18 Conference 7.15.17 #38

Camilla. me, and Chris Ulmer.                                                                            Taken by a friend

2017 Chromosome 18 Conference 7.15.17 #39

Me with Camilla.                                          Taken by a friend

Macy went up to ask her parents if they felt like playing Monopoly Deal. Of course, I watched. A few hours later, Macy headed up to the room with her parents so her parents could get ready. A few minutes later though, Macy came back down and she suggested we take a walk on a few hotel room floors. So we walked around on the 2nd and 3rd floor until Rebecca messaged me asking where I was. Macy and I headed back down to the lobby to the ballroom for dinner. We took our seats and many friends took pictures of us while we waited for dinner to come. After I finished dinner, I went on the dance floor for a little bit before heading to the restroom. I came back and was ready to dance more. Here are a few of the songs that played: Let It Go, We Are Family and Y.M.C.A. We danced for 3 hours straight while Macy went to bed 1 hour into the dancing. So Macy and I said our goodbyes. I was tired and could barely move or hear when the dance finally ended. So I got ready for bed and went to sleep.

July 16th, 2017: 

2017 Chromosome 18 Conference 7.16.17 #44

Me and Thomas at the Riverwalk                               Borrowed from Camilla

2017 Chromosome 18 Conference 7.16.17 #42

Me.                                                     Taken by Camilla

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Me, Camilla, and Thomas

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Thomas in front of a tree.                                                  Taken by Camilla

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Thomas.                                               Taken by Camilla

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I woke up late so I ended up having brunch. After I took a quick shower, we waited for the Marriott shuttle to take us near the Naperville Riverwalk. After we finished exploring, 2017 Chromosome 18 Conference 7.16.17 #40we went back to the hotel to wait for Lyft to come pick us up and drop us off at the Chicago Midway Airport. After we went through security which was pretty quick, we 2017 Chromosome 18 Conference 7.16.17 #432017 Chromosome 18 Conference 7.16.17 #472017 Chromosome 18 Conference 7.16.17 #45found a spot to stand while the airplane was being prepared to board a lot of people on including us. We got on the plane and waited for the plane to take off. Once, we 2017 Chromosome 18 Conference 7.16.17 #46lifted off I once again got honey roasted peanuts and had them with cereal and cashews. I also got a cup of apple juice. Camilla and Thomas took a nap while I watched the gorgeous sunset. After a while, I could see Reno’s highway. A few moments later we landed.

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Thomas

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Me.

2017 Chromosome 18 Conference 7.16.17 #64

I went down the steps while Camilla and Thomas went down the escalator. We then found our luggage. After that, we headed out to our car to drive home. Once we got home, I dug out the most need items from my bag. I went to sleep in my very own bed peacefully.

More links:

http://theteamtlc.com/

https://www.chromosome18.org/

Mandala Legend With History

Hey, everyone! You are about to enter a historical story about a mandala. I hope you enjoy!

Once upon a time, there lived a mandala who lived alone. One day, the mandala went for a walk. The mandala came along a little hole with golden light shining through. The mandala thought,”What is that golden light?”.

So the mandala decided to take a peek. The mandala was very surprised that inside the hole was an another mandala living alone. Furthermore, that mandala used sunlight to help bring peace to his home.

She noticed the other mandala looking around the small room and thought,”Goodness me, I didn’t see anyone peeking through the sunlight.” Even so, she invited the mandala in and she noticed the mandala enjoying the sunlight as well. So if you ever see a mandala in the sunlight, that could have been a distant relative of the mandala.

Here is some history about mandalas:

The word “mandala” is Sanskrit for “circle.” According to Mandala artist Charles Gilchrist, creator of “Sacred Geometry,” a wandering guru may have brought the first meditation mandalas to Tibet in about the eighth century. Mandalas have been found across the Far East, and Native Americans symbolism is based on the “sacred hoop.” Mandalas are considered to be of Eastern origin, but it would be difficult, if not impossible, to find any civilization without some awareness of the circle’s symbolism and the potential for spiritual self-examination.

Image result for mandala in color

Mandala

Reference:

http://peopleof.oureverydaylife.com/history-mandala-7424.html

 

Fairy Shadows

Hey, everyone! You are about to read another part of the Fairyland series. I hope you enjoy!

Once, there was a girl who dreamed of shadows in Fairyland. Her name was Lilliana. She was curious why the shadows were orange, pink, and many other colors. In Fairyland, the shadows were very pretty and very stylish.

One day, she decided to live in Fairyland. So she packed everything she thought was necessary. After she was done packing, she headed to Fairyland.

When she arrived, she began observing the colorful shadows. After a while, she went to ask the Shadow fairy why the shadows were colored. The Shadow fairy said,”I was experimenting with shadows. Everyone seemed to like the colorful shadows. So I left it that way.”

Lilliana said, “That’s amazing. Do you mind if I live in Fairyland?”Absolutely!” said the Shadow fairy. So Lilliana thanked the Shadow fairy and went on her way.

Lilliana met a fairy named Samantha and they became the best of friends. Samantha actucally referred Lilliana to Amal and Jessica. Lilliana said,”It’s nice to meet you, Jessica & Amal.”

Jessica and Samantha visited Lilliana a lot after that day. When Lilliana got to her preferred age, she started wanting Amal to visit with Lilliana. At first, she wanted Amal to come with Jessica and Samantha.

But after a while, Lilliana wanted Amal to come alone. As they visited more frequently, their friendship blossomed into love. One day, they went to the Fairyland telescope so Lilliana could see her home on earth. 

Lilliana was surprised at how much the place changed. Lilliana yearned to go back. So Lilliana became the Sun Fairy and Lilliana could visit the Earth when she wished to. 

Amal asked, “Will you marry me?”Of course, she said Yes. So they got engaged. After a year, they planned a wedding. On June 21, they got married.

From this day forward, you can see them flying happily across the sky. Amal is the sky fairy. Sarah and Jessica worked as a spring and summer fairy. 

The End! 

I hope you enjoyed the story!

Fairyland

Books I Recommend: A Minty Mess by Helen Perelman

Hey, everyone! This is my 56th book recommendation. I hope you enjoy! Also, in case your wondering the blue link are amazon affiliates. (It means we earn a few cents from what you paid for the book).

1. A Minty Mess by Helen Perelman

2. Jelly Bean Jumble by Helen Perelman

3. The Coconut Clue by Helen Perelman

4. Taffy Trouble by Helen Perelman

5. Sweet Secrets by Helen Perelman

6. Werewolves Don’t Run for President by Debbie Dadey and Marcia Thornton Jones

7. The Rainbow Opal by Paula Harrison

8. The Ice Diamond by Paula Harrison

9. Horrible Harry and the Battle of the Bugs by Suzy Kline

10. Taking Wing by Nancy Price Graff

11. Marie-Grace and the Orphans by Sarah Masters Buckley

12. Meet Marie-Grace by Sarah Masters Buckley

13. A Shiloh Christmas by Phillips Reynolds Naylor

14. The Tiger, the Brahman, and The Jackal by M. J. York

15. Paint It by Mari Bolte

16. The Sea Tiger by Victoria Turnbull

17. A Very Personal Computer by Justine Rendal

18. Tales From Watership Down by Richard Adams

19. Before You Were Born by Howard Schwartz

20. Three Magic Balloons by Paul Margulies

21. The Trouble with Henry by Deborah O’Neal

22. Little America by Richard Evelyn Byrd

23. The Chocolate Dreams by Helen Perelman

24. Presenting Buffalo Bill by Candace Fleming

25. The Mystery of the Singing Ghost by Gertrude Chandler Warner

26. What I Really Want to do is Direct by Trudi Trueit

27. Journey to the Blue Moon by Rebecca Rupp

28. The Magic Paintbrush by Laurence Yep

29. The Dogs Of Winter by Bobbie Pyron

30. A Whale of a Tale by Debbie Dadey

31. The Genie in the Book by Cindy Trumbore

32. Alone by Admiral Richard E. Byrd

33.  Because of Thursday by Patricia Polacco

34. The Bear Report by Thyra Heder

35. The Great Doughnut Parade by Rebecca Bond

36. Colorado by Barbara A. Somervill

37. Illinois by Michael Burgan

38. Indiana by Darlene R. Stille

39. Iowa by Jean F. Blashfield

40. Nebraska by Ann Heinrichs

41. The Luminous Pearl by Betty L. Torre

42. Little Hands Celebrate America! by Jill Frankel Hauser

43. Polar Bear, Arctic Hare by Eileen Spinelli

44. Art by Heather Alexander

45. You’re Here For A Reason by Nancy Tillman

46. The Treehouse by Marije Tolman and Ronald Tolman

47. The Encyclopedia of Crystals, Herbs, and New Age Elements by Adams Media

48. All Hail The Queen by Erica David

49. Treasure by Tennant Redbank

50. The Book by Keith Houston

51. Four Mice Deep In The Jungle by Geronimo Stilton

52. The Karate Mouse by Geronimo Stilton

53. Neversink by Barry Wolverton

54. Unhooking the Moon by Gregory Hughes

55. Philippa Fisher and the Dream-Maker’s Daughter by Liz Kessler

56. Trixie the Halloween Fairy by Daisy Meadows

57. Annabelle the Drawing Fairy by Daisy Meadows

58. The People and Culture of the Blackfeet by Kris Rickard and Raymond Bial

A Christmas Story

Hey, everyone! You’re about to read a Christmas story. I hope you enjoy!

Once there was a Christmas angel named Holly. Holly wanted to find a way to make Christmas more memorable than ever.

So Holly set out to do some research. She found that the only way to do that was to put a sprig of holly in doorways.

After Holly spruced up some holly, she went to her friend Mistletoe. Holly told her about her idea and Mistletoe suggested that she transform holly into mistletoe.

Mistletoe said that she’d help with mistletoe. Holly came up with another idea and she said let’s wait until Christmas Eve to do it.

Holly told Mistletoe the plan. The plan was for Mistletoe to stand behind Holly and when Holly gave the signal Mistletoe would change the holly into mistletoe.

Mistletoe agreed to the plan. On Christmas Eve, Holly and Mistletoe tested their magic.

After they tested their magic, they announced that Christmas would never again be the same.

Mistletoe and Holly prepared for the trick fast. By the time, they were prepared everyone was there.

So Mistletoe was standing behind Holly. Holly aimed her hand toward the holly. Holly gave the secret signal to Mistletoe.

When Mistletoe got the signal, she immediately transformed all the hollies into mistletoe.

The people who watched clapped in amazement. Little did they know, the mistletoe and holly was magical.

The people went back to their Christmas celebration. The Christmas spirit was stronger than before.

To this day, you can feel the Christmas spirit presence.

That’s the end of my Christmas story. I hope you enjoyed the story.

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Merry Christmas!

Books I Recommend: Crane by Jeff Stone

Hey, everyone! This is my 54th book recommendation. I hope you enjoy!

1. Crane by Jeff Stone

2. Genie in a Bottle by Sarah Mlynowski

3. Night of the Ninth Dragon by Mary Pope Osborne

4. Hair Today, Gone Tomorrow! by Nancy Krulik

5. Another Kind of Hurricane by Tamra Ellis Smith

6. O Come, All Ye Faithful by David Christiana

7. Karate Katie by Nancy Krulik

8. Get Into Gear, Stilton! by Geronimo Stilton

9. Waggit’s Tale by Peter Howe

10. Waggit Again by Peter Howe

11. Christmas by Natalie M. Rosinsky

12. Christmas in England by Cheryl L. Enderlein

13.  The Polar Express by Chris Van Allsburg

14. Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis

15. Christmas by Arlene Erlbach

16. Celebrate Christmas with Carols, Presents, and Peace by Deborah Heiligman

17. Christmas in Australia by Ellen Hughes

18. Christmas in Russia by World Book Inc.

19. Victorian Christmas by Bobbie Kalman and Barbara Bedell

20. Cam Jansen and the Scary Snake Mystery by David A. Adler

21. Truth with a Capital T by Bethany Hegedus

22. Cam Jansen and the Sports Day Mysteries by David A. Adler

23. Cam Jansen and the Green School Mystery by David A. Adler

24. My Life as a Cartoonist by Janet Tashjian

25. Christmas USA by Mary D. Lankford

26. The Kingfisher Book of Classic Christmas Stories by Ian Whybrow

29. Fright Night by Geronimo Stilton

30. Wish Upon a Starfish by Debbie Dadey

31. Dragon by Jeff Stone

32. Chickadee by Louise Erdrich

33. Bakers on Board by Sheryl Berk and Carrie Berk

34. Mouse by Jeff Stone

35. Ruffleclaw by Cornelia Funke

36. Emma and the Blue Genie by Cornelia Funke

37. The Mother-Daughter Book Club by Heather Vogel Frederick

38. The Art and Life of Roy Lightenstein by Susan Goldman Rubin

39. Las Posadas by Diane Hoyt-Goldsmith

40. Happy New Year, Beni by Jane Breskin Zalben

41. Five Children on the Western Front by Kate Saunders

42. Snake by Jeff Stone

43. Looking at Paintings by National Gallery Company Limited

44. Marilyn Monroe by Lisa Owings

45. Mockingbird by Kathryn Erskine

46. Stranded In Boringsville by Catherine Bateson

47. A Fairy’s Gift by Kiki Thorpe

48. The Shimmering Stone by Paula Harrison

49. Honey by Sarah Weeks

50. The Friend by Sarah Stewart

51. Eight Winter Nights by Laura Krauss Melmed

52. The Little Match Girl by Christine San José

53. Washington, D.C. by Blake Hoena

54. My Life With Nature by Joseph Cornell

55. The Dreidel That Wouldn’t Spin by Martha Seif Simpson

56. How To Draw Fish by Justin Lee

*Just so you know, these blue links are Amazon Affiliates.  This actually means that if you click on one of the Amazon Affiliates for more info about a book, and if you buy a book, we will get a few cents.  

Beauty in You

Hey, everyone! I’m sharing with you some beauty tips, health tips, and other tips. I hope you enjoy!

Using Coconut Oil:

Coconut oil is excellent for dental health. After brushing teeth with your regular toothpaste, put coconut oil on the toothbrush, and brush your gums and teeth. This will feel awesome. It leaves your teeth feeling smooth and freshens your breath. The toothpaste that I use is Auromère.

You can spread coconut oil on your bread or waffle before putting it in the toaster too.

Using Something to Keep Your Hair Out of Your Face:

I prefer headbands or bobby pins but you can use hairstyles, hats, clips, scrunchies, and more depending on your hair length. I suggest if you want to grow out your hair that you use bobby pins or headbands.

Putting Something on Your Eyes To Protect Your Eyes From Sunlight:

Select 100% UV protection sunglasses. You can get a design on your sunglasses that you like best. For example, flower sunglasses, summer sunglasses, fairy sunglasses, or princess sunglasses are all some suggestions.

The Food You Eat:

Healthy foods like organic fruit, organic vegetables, protein, healthy oils, water, and whole grains are mostly what I eat. If you want candy, get organic candy with no artificial colors, additives, preservatives, or high fructose corn syrup. If you want cookies, get organic cookies. If you want cake, make a homemade cake with organic ingredients and if you want chips, find organic chips at Whole Foods or Trader Joe’s or wherever you shop.

Exercise:

I suggest exercising once a week when you are just beginning exercising. Once you’ve gotten good at doing exercising once a week, do twice a week to make it a bit challenging. Repeat this until you’re doing it, 7 days a week.

Try using beginner yoga, wall sits, air cycle, windshield wipers with your feet. After that, you can try harder yoga and so on. You can use dancing, gymnastics, and walking to help you get stronger and flexible. You can try weight lifting but take it easy with weight lifting.

Paint Nails:

If you are going to use nail polish, try using Mineral Fusion or Zoya nail polish or any brand without harsh ingredients. If you can, leave your toes, hands, or both unpainted or put just a clear polish on your toes, hands, or both to make them look glossy.

Bathing:

Use Aveda shampoo and conditioner (or other brands with natural ingredients as what we use on our hair travels into our body) on your hair when you wash it. If you prefer every other bath/shower day to wash your hair, go for it. Camilla does it for me once a week.

I bathe with Whole Food’s scented soap most of the time. If I run out of scented soap, I use Dove’s unscented soap.

The Drinks You Drink:

I suggest drinking just plain spring water if you can. Better yet, to begin the day with squeezing half a lime or lemon in your water. This will help wake up the water. If you don’t like to drink water, try drinking juice at least once a day. Be sure to get fresh squeezed juice or fresh pressed juice. Stay away from juices that are made from concentrate.

Depending on your body, you might want to find out how many cups of drinks your body might want. For me, I drink 2 cups of water and 1 cup of juice. It’s still okay to drink something when you’re thirsty unless it’s wine, coffee, or any drink that makes you hyper.

Books I Recommend: The Song Reader by Lisa Tucker

Hey, everyone! This is my 52nd book recommendation. I hope you enjoy!

1. The Song Reader by Lisa Tucker

2. Scaredy Cat by Courtney Sheinmel

3. My Friends Call Me Sam by Monica McDivitt

4. The Complete Book of the Flower Fairies by Cicely Mary Barker

5. The Secret Book Club by Ann M. Martin

6. Fairies and Magical Creatures by Matthew Reinhart and Robert Sabuda

7. Julia the Sleeping Beauty Fairy by Daisy Meadows

8. Oh, Look! by Patricia Polacco

9. Sun and Moon by Lisa Desimini

10. Clever Ali by Nancy Farmer

11. The Snow Show with Chef Kelvin by Carolyn Fisher

12. Mythological Creatures by Lynn Curlee

13. Beauty, Her Basket by Sandra Belton

14. Maple by Lori Nichols

15. When The Shadbush Blooms by Carla Messinger with Susan Katz

16. A Christmas Tale by Geronimo Stilton

17. Stink and the Shark Sleepover by Megan McDonald

18. Lights! Camera! Cupcakes! by Coco Simon

19. Any Way You Slice It by Nancy Krulik

20. Drat! You Copycat! by Nancy Krulik

21. Horrible Harry and the Mud Gremlins by Suzy Kline

22. Bad Rap by Nancy Krulik

23. Sleeping Beauty by Catherine Hapka

24. The Case of the Class Clown by James Preller

25. The Little Mermaid by Amy Edgar

26. Princess Stories by Fiona Waters

27. Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle’s Farm by Betty MacDonald

28. Nuts to You by Lynne Rae Perkins

29. Lion by Jeff Stone

30. What the Witch Left by Ruth Chew

31. The Pilgrim Village Mystery by Gertrude Chandler Warner

32. I Am The Wallpaper by Mark Peter Hughes

33. Time Travel and Warp Drives by Allen and Thomas Roman

34. Walking to School by Eve Bunting

35. Super Simple Ice Projects by Kelly Doudna

36. Close-Up Magic by Nicholas Einhorn

37. Paper and Paint by Waterbirds Books

38. Look and Make With Paper by Sea-to-Sea Publications

39. Jackson Pollock by Clare Oliver

40. John Smith Escapes Again! by Rosalyn Schanzer

41. Wilma Unlimited by Kathleen Krull

42. Thumbelina by Brian Pinkney

43. Swans by Lynn M. Stone

44. Origami Activities by Michael G. LaFosse

45. The Period Book by Karen Gravelle and Jennifer Gravelle

46.  Billie Holiday by Bud Kliment

47. Walt Disney by Tamra B. Orr

48. For The Right To Learn by Rebecca Langston-George

49. The Kingfisher Nature Encyclopedia by David Burne

50. A Child’s Garden by Molly Dannenmaier

51. Across The Wide Dark Sea by Jean Van Leeuwen

52. Trick or Treat, Smell My Feet by Diane deGroat

53. I Pledge Allegiance by Pat Mora and Libby Martinez

54. Betas by Walt Mauraus

(The blue links you see are Amazon Affilates). 

Amazing Nature Party: What the Guests Did At The Party

Hey, everyone! This is part 6 of the Amazing Nature Party series. In this part of the series, you’ll find the answers to the questions asked in Part 5. I hope you enjoy!

The party guests were very pleased that the unicorn and the Nature fairy came to their incredible party so they made the unicorn and the Nature fairy the guests of honor.

The Nature fairy  said, “I really must go to get you more attention for your nature party. I really enjoyed being the guest of honor and my unicorn said that she enjoyed being the animal of honor.”

As she spoke kindly, she got ready to go find some people who would be inspired, impressed, and most importantly have fun at the party.

Meanwhile, the nature party leader decided to make better expressions so the guests rode their animals and had a race. They also set up games, entertainment, and more.

The Nature fairy found some great people who are willing to give the Nature party a try. She also found polar seals, tiger dog, and other fantasy animals.

Who were the people that were willing to give the Nature party a try? Why did the nature party need more impressions?

That’s the end of part 6 of the Amazing Nature Party series. Keep your eyes peeled for part 7 of the Amazing Nature Party.

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Sunset of a mountain and forest.

The History Of Thanksgiving: How Countries Celebrate Thanksgiving

Hey, everyone! If you want to learn the history of Thanksgiving and how countries celebrate, you’ve come to the right place. You’ll learn a lot about Thanksgiving in this blog post.

Some people believe the first Canadian Thanksgiving had occurred in 1578 when an explorer named Martin Frobisher held a Thanksgiving feast for his survival on his journey from England.

Some people think that the first Thanksgiving celebrations in Canda can be traced back to French settlers.  These settlers who came to New France in the 1600s with explorer Samuel de Champlain celebrated successful harvests with giant feasts of thanks.

A big portion of Canada considers Thanksgiving a statutory holiday. The first Thanksgiving in the United States was in 1621 at Plymouth. This feast was prompted by a good harvest and celebrated by pilgrims and puritans.

It wasn’t until the 1660s that the harvest feast became an annual affair. Each year the President of the United States pardon a turkey. This lucky turkey is guaranteed to spend the rest of its life living freely and not ending up on a turkey platter.

When the pilgrims arrived on the Mayflower, the Wampanoag Indians taught them how to cultivate the land. These Indians were invited to the first Thanksgiving in 1621. The first Thanksgiving was celebrated for 3 days in 1621.

The first Thanksgiving feast was made of lobster, chestnuts, onions, leeks, dried fruit, cabbage, carrots, chicken, rabbit, honey,  maple syrup, and other items. There were no pumpkin pies, mashed potatoes, or corn in the cob at the first Thanksgiving feast.

The writer of Mary Had A Little Lamb, Sarah Josepha Hale, is thought to be the person to persuaded Abraham Lincoln to make Thanksgiving a national holiday. In 1863, Abraham Lincoln declared the last Thursday of November to be the national day of Thanksgiving.

Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade began in the 1920s and it is still held today. Approximately, 280 turkeys consumed on Thanksgiving in the United States. The Friday after Thanksgiving is called Black Friday in the United States and it is the first official shopping day of Christmas.

Even if the turkeys wanted to escape before Thanksgiving, they can’t fly. Commercially, raised turkeys aren’t able to fly. Other countries that celebrate Thanksgiving include Germany (they celebrate the Harvest Thanksgiving Festival in early October), Grenada (they celebrate Thanksgiving Day on October 25th), Korea (they celebrate Korean Thanksgiving in late September or early October), Japan (they celebrate Labor Thanksgiving on November 23rd), Liberia (they celebrate Thanksgiving on the first Thursday of November), and Norfolk Island celebrates Thanksgiving on the last Wednesday of November.

The traditional cornucopia was a curved goat’s horn filled to the brim with fruits and grains. According to a Greek legend, Amalthea (a goat) broke one of her horns and offered it to Greek God Zeus as a sign of reverence.

As a sign of gratitude, Zeus later set the goat’s image in the sky known as Capricorn. Cornucopia is the most common symbol of a harvest festival. A horn shaped cornucopia, it is filled with the abundance of the Earth’s harvest. It is also known as the horn of plenty.

The first known Thanksgiving feast or festival in North America was celebrated by Franciso Vásquez de Coronado and the people he called Tejas (members of the Hasinai group of Caldo speaking Native Americans).

Turducken, a turkey stuffed with a duck stuffed with chicken, is becoming more popular in Thanksgiving (originated in Louisiana). A turducken is a deboned turkey stuffed with a deboned duck, which itself is stuffed with a small deboned chicken.

The cavity of the chicken and the rest of the gaps are filled with, at the very least, a highly seasoned breadcrumb mixture (although some versions have a different stuffing for each bird).

Fossil evidence shows that turkeys roamed the Americas 10 million years ago. Ninety-one percent of Americans eat turkey on Thanksgiving Day. There are regional differences as to the “stuffing” (or “dressing”) traditionally served with the turkey.

Southerners generally make theirs from cornbread, while in other parts of the country white bread is the base. One or several of the following may be added: oysters, apples, chestnuts, raisins, celery and/or other vegetables, sausage or the turkey’s giblets.

Thomas Jefferson thought the concept of Thanksgiving was “the ridiculous idea I’ve ever heard.” Every President since Lincoln proclaimed Thanksgiving Day. But in 1939, 1940, and 1941 Franklin D. Roosevelt proclaimed Thanksgiving the third Thursday in November to lengthen the holiday shopping season.

This upset  a lot of people. The North American holiday season (generally the Christmas shopping season in the U.S.) traditionally begins when Thanksgiving ends, on Black Friday (the day after Thanksgiving) this tradition has held forth since at least the 1930s.

On the West Coast of the US, Dungeness crab is common as an alternate main dish instead of turkey, as crab season starts in early November. Corn is one of the popular symbols of Thanksgiving.

The corn came in many varieties of color – red, white, blue, and yellow. Some Americans considered blue and white corn sacred. The oldest corn date 7000 years back and they were grown in Mexico.

Benjamin Franklin wanted the national bird to be a turkey. A spooked turkey can run at speeds up to 20 miles per hour. They can also burst into flight approaching speeds between 50-55 mph in a matter of seconds.

More than 40 million green bean casseroles are served on Thanksgiving. Turkey is the traditional dish for the Thanksgiving feast. In the US, about 280 million turkeys are sold for the Thanksgiving celebrations. There is no official reason or declaration for the use of turkey.

They just happened to be the most plentiful meat available at the time of the first Thanksgiving in 1621, starting the tradition. Turkeys are first documented over two thousand years ago in Central America and Mexico.

Twenty percent of cranberries eaten are eaten on Thanksgiving. The preliminary estimate of the number of turkeys raised in the United States in 2005 is 256 million. That’s down 3 percent from 2004.

The turkeys produced in 2004 weighed 7.3 billion pounds altogether and were valued $3.1 billion. Fifty percent of Americans put the stuffing inside the turkey. In October 1777, all 13 colonies celebrated Thanksgiving for the first time; however, it was a one-time affair commemorating a victory over the British at Saratoga.

Turkeys were one of the first animals in the Americas to be domesticated. Columbus thought that the land he discovered was connected to India, where peacocks are found in considerable number.

And he believed turkeys were a type of peacock (they’re actually a type of pheasant). So he named them tuka, which is a peacock in the Tamil language of India. There are three places in the United States named after the holiday’s traditional main course – Turkey, Texas; Turkey Creek, Louisianna; and Turkey, North Carolina.

There are also nine townships around the country named Turkey with three in Kansas. The wishbone of the turkey is used in a good luck ritual on Thanksgiving Day. The cranberry is a symbol and a modern diet staple of Thanksgiving.

Originally called the crane berry, it derived its name from its pink blossoms and drooping head, which reminded the Pilgrims of a crane. The different nicknames for Thanksgiving: Turkey Day (after the traditional dinner), T-Day (an abbreviation of Thanksgiving Day or Turkey Day), Macy’s Day (this is exclusive to New York City – it’s a reference to the Macy’s Day Parade), Yanksgiving (Canadians sometimes call the Thanksgiving in the US as “Yanksgiving” to distinguish it from the Canadian Thanksgiving holiday).

Several people wanted to have an official day of thanksgiving, including George Washington, who proclaimed a National Day of Thanksgiving in 1789. Several people did not want it including President Thomas Jefferson.

The first Thanksgiving lasted three days. Wild turkeys, while technically the same species as domesticated turkeys, have a very different taste from farm-raised turkeys. Almost all of the meat is “dark” (even the breasts) with a more intense turkey flavor.

Older heritage breeds also differ in flavor. The Guinness Book of Records states that the greatest dressed weight recorded for a turkey is 39.09 kg (86 lbs), at the annual “heaviest turkey” competition held in London, England on December 12, 1989.

Contrary to popular belief, Native Americans did not eat cranberries. They did, however, find them extremely useful for dying fabric and decorating pottery. The Native Americans wore deerskin and fur, not blankets.

In Africa, the harvest festivals have a lot of religious connotations. Dancing and singing are a special part of the festival. People who take part in dances wear traditional masks and outfits.

Each dance sequence unfolds a unique story. The Festival of Yams is a popular harvest festival. Yams are the most common food. Yams are the first crops to be harvested.  This festival is celebrated with days of ceremonies and offerings to God and the ancestors.

The offerings are later distributed among the village folk. This is their way of giving thanks to the spirit. The festival is normally held in the month of August, marking the end of rainy season.

The Homowo Festival is the largest cultural festival of Africa. The people of Ghana which is in West Africa celebrate the Homowo Festival as a traditional harvest festival.  The festival starts with a procession.

People from local African and African-American take parts assuming the roles of kings and queens. The African and African-American people also consider themselves as the follower of the royal family of each of Ghana’s ethnic groups.

The people of Africa hold a cultural ceremony called first fruits in order to bless the newly harvested crops and purify the people before they eat the foods. Across the nation in September and October, you’ll find communities coming together to celebrate the changing of the seasons and the successful harvest of another crop.

Although a good number of fall festivals happen prior to October, there are more than enough left so that you should be able to find a popular harvest festival near anyone. In Alaska each autumn, people hold a series of festivals and spiritual ceremonies after the end of salmon fishing and the berry harvest.

The festivals last throughout the winter months. People are addressing the spirits who could be helpful or harmful  by dancing and songs. The people also appeal to the souls of animals upon whose everyone’s life depended on.

During dances, people wear masks and beautiful decorated ceremonial dresses. Most interestingly, men and women take part in the dance followed by the beats of skin drums, bird beak rattles, and piercing whistles which were used to call on the spirits to the dance home.

Harvest Festival in Austria is all about enjoying life. Saint Leopold’s feast day marks the start of the heurigen which is the new wine season in Austria. People of Austria celebrate this festive day with outdoor wine tastings and wine picnics.

They also celebrate the festival by folk music and live music. This is the day for the pilgrimage to Klosterneuburg Abbey, home of the eminent wine called Leopolsberg. The typical Austrian thanksgiving celebration called Erntedankfest is a rural harvest time.

Leopold’s Day custom called Fasselrutschen which is also called sliding down the cask involves a tremendous 12,000-gallon wooden barrel, commissioned by the abbot for Klosterneuberg wine cellar in 1704.

People climb to the top of the cask one by one and then the people slide down its smooth wooden side for good luck. It has been said the rougher the side, the better the luck. Nyepi is one of the most important festivals in Bali, signals the beginning of a new lunar year.

The festival usually falls during the spring equinox (late March, early April). On this day, all people (including tourists) must remain silent, and no-one may work, travel or take part in any indulgences.

This festival is a time of purification to make sure they have good crops. Kulkuls are alarm drums which are positioned in small towers in every Balinese village.  The night of the full moon festivities observed at the end of the September.

The festival provides excitement for crowds of travelers and also for those who are taking part in the celebration. Crop Over is a traditional harvest festival which began in Barbados.  The festival had its early beginnings on the sugar cane plantations during the colonial period.

The Crop Over tradition featured singing, dancing and during this festival carts and animals were decorated with flowers that would bring the cane to the plantation owner. The plantation owners then provide a feast for the laborers.

During Crop Over you can see parades, dances, and fireworks, and hear calypso bands, enjoy arts and crafts (beautiful wooden sculptures, woven straw mats, and colorful clay pottery) and taste the same kind of food and drinks that the slaves prepared in the 19th century.

Crop Over is a three-week long festival of feasting and enjoyment. The festival begins with a parade, for the ceremonial delivery of the last sugar canes. The timing of Harvest festival varies according to weather conditions and location. But festivals are held all over Britain at the end of the summer to celebrate the bringing in of the crops, usually during September.

In Britain, the time for the harvest festival starts when the wheat has been cut and the apples have been picked. The decoration of churches takes place and the churches are decorated with flowers during the harvest time.

People have a belief that bringing a plow into the church for a blessing will result into a plentiful harvesting during the next year. In Britain, the harvest festival is attached to the gathering of the last sheaf of corn.

The reapers raise a great Harvest Shout as it was cut. The last sheaf was treated with special respect and used to make Corn Dollies. This was done as people believed that the corn spirit lived in the wheat.

The Corn Dolly was then placed on the top of the final load of corn and carried back to the village in triumph. By creating the dolly, the spirit is kept alive for the next year and for the new crop.

Sometimes, the dollies are hung up in the farmhouse or in the church or in the barn. The dolly would be plowed back into the soil during the spring season. Another story about a Corn Dolly is in the folksong ‘John Barleycorn’:

“There were three men come from the West their fortunes for to try, and these three made a solemn vow: “John Barleycorn must die.” They plowed, they sowed, they harrowed him in, Threw clods upon his head, Till these three men were satisfied John Barleycorn was dead.”

However, in the spring John Barleycorn rises up through the soil. By and by he grows big and strong, even growing a beard. Consequently, the three men cut him down at the knee, tie him to a cart, beat him, strip the flesh off his bones and grind him between two stones.

Nevertheless, in the end, it is John Barleycorn who defeats his opponents. He proves the stronger man by turning into beer. In Britain, there is an old tradition to bake a loaf in the shape of a wheat sheaf, which is done using the last of the harvested grain.

The loaf is then taken to the richly decorated church. This is done as a symbol of thanksgiving for the harvest. Throughout the world, harvest time has always been the occasion for extraordinary customs.

They celebrate the harvest time wearing special costumes and are known to be the pearly kings and queens. The August Moon Festival or the Mid-Autumn Festival or the Moon Cake Festival is one of the most celebrated Chinese harvest festivals.

The festival is held on the 15th day of the 8th lunar month which is in September or early October in the Gregorian calendar, close to the autumnal equinox. This festival of china ends with a big feast. The Chinese have Moon Cakes during the festival.

Friends and relatives send Moon cakes to each other as a way of giving thanks. People enjoy music and dancing and eating round yellow Moon Cakes. The Autumn Moon festival has much in common with the Thanksgiving Festival.

The Round moon cakes are baked and enjoyed, ornate lanterns are made and hung, and lovers are encouraged to come out of their homes and relax in the glow of the full moon.  According to a say, the moon is at its brightest and roundest on this day.

Friendships are made and renewed on this day. Chinese poets keep writing for many years about long lost lovers finding their way to each other on this special night. The August Moon festival is often recognized as the Women’s festival.

The moon symbolizes beauty and elegance and is also referred as a female principle and is a trusted friend. Many ancient August Moon folktales are about a Moon Maiden. On the 15th night of the 8th lunar moon, little children on earth can see a lady on the Moon.

And those who make wishes to the Lady on the Moon will find their dreams come true. Mid-Autumn is a time for family, friends and loved ones to gather and enjoy the full moon that is a symbol of abundance, harmony, and luck.

Families enjoy picnics or special dinners. And those who make wishes to the Lady on the Moon will find their dreams come true. Mid-Autumn is a time for family, friends and loved ones to gather and enjoy the full moon that is a symbol of abundance, harmony, and luck.

Families enjoy picnics or special dinners. Dutch harvest hymns helped popularize his idea of harvest festival and spread the annual custom of decorating churches with home-grown produce for the Harvest Festival service.

During this harvest festival, the feast was held to honor the Hungarian saint .The Hungarian Saint used to hide in a barn after hearing that he has been appointed a bishop as they believed that they did not earn such an honor.

A honking goose was to reveal his hiding place and so roast goose became a traditional dish for Martinmas feast, along with wine made from the grape harvest. Also During this festival, we can see children marching in parades carrying homemade lanterns following the Halloween tradition.

The ancient Egyptians were always ready to party and celebrate. In fact, almost all the days in the year they seemed to be celebrating something or a god. The celebration of the springtime harvest festival in Egypt was dedicated to ‘Min‘.

In Egypt, spring was the harvest season and this was the time to hold the festival. The people especially the Pharaoh (the most powerful person in ancient Egypt) took part in the parade during this festival. After the parade, the great feast was held.

People also used to take part in music, dancing, and sports which were a part of the celebration. When the Egyptian farmers completed harvesting their corn, they used to cry and pretend to be a grief-stricken.

This was done to mislead the spirits of which they believed lived in the corn. The farmers had the fear that the spirits might become angry when they cut down the corn on which the spirits used to live.

Worship of Demeter as their goddess of all grains seems to have occurred primarily in connection to natural fertility. Every year during autumn, the festival of Thesmosphoria was held to honor the goddess.

On the very first day of the festival, Married women build leafy shelters and furnish them with couches which were made with plants.  On the Second day, they had a fast. On the third day, a feast was held and they offer gifts of seed corn, cakes, fruits, and pigs to the goddess Demeter.

They had a hope that Demeter who was their god would grant them a good harvest. In Northern India, People celebrate harvest festival during the spring season, which is either in late February or early March. People harvest their wheat in spring.

This is also the time for Holi, which is a Hindu Harvest festival. Holi lasts for five days. Everyone dresses up, or buy new clothes during the occasion.  People wear old clothes as part of the celebration and throw colored water and Red Powder at each other and indulge in the fun of the festival.

Holi is the festival where all whether they are family, friends or strangers get the same treatment. Candy Game and Tug of War are two such games which are played during the festival of Holi.

Everyone is allowed to participate in these games. People also build and light bonfires. After the flames have died down the ashes, they are rubbed over people’s forehead. This is done only to bring good luck for the year ahead.

There are different names of the harvest festival celebrated in India. For example: In Northern India, it is known as Lohri, In Assam, it is called Bhogali Bihu, In Uttar Pradesh and Bihar it is known as Makar Sankranti, and in Andhra Pradesh, it is celebrated as Bhogi.

The primary crop harvested in Eastern India is Rice. Springtime is the season of love and at this time they celebrate the love story of the God, Krishna, and Radha. The images of the two gods surrounded by flowers are pulled by decorated animals in a procession through the streets.

People offer flowers before the images in the temples. The love story of Krishna and Radha is dramatized or it is recalled by reading verses from a very long poem known as the Bhagavata Purana. Bhagavata Purana means “Ancient Stories of the Lord”.

People also have bonfires and they hold a dance where Men and Women dance in separate groups around the bonfires. They also throw colorful powder and waters at each other.

Onam is one of the most popular harvest festivals of Kerala in Southern India. It is a time for everyone to reap the benefits of a good harvest after a year of hard work and labor. Onam festival is celebrated in the memory of popular King Mahabali.

The festival is a time for communal thanksgiving. The famous ‘Snake boat’ race is organized every year. It is a season of dances, songs, food, worshipping among other festivities.

Women wear new sarees and they dress up their children in colorful clothes. The traditional ‘Pookkalam’ a flower mat that adorns the courtyard of almost every house.   ‘Payasam’ is the most popular dish among the various dishes during this festival.

Pongal is another four days of harvest festival in Southern India which is celebrated with immense joy and enthusiasm. It is celebrated on the 14th of January every year.  Pongal means the boiling of milk and rice.

Born fire and feasting is a common feature of the festival. Pongal has also known as ‘VenPongal’ and during this festival, farmers express their gratitude. Pongal is basically held to honor the Sun for a bountiful harvest.

People decorate their houses and families gather together to rejoice and offer Pongal to Sun.  There is a belief that celebrating the harvest festival will bring prosperity, joy, and happiness.

Chu Suk is the popular harvest festival in Korea which is celebrated as a mark of respect to elders. The festival is a time for feasting and happiness. Families visit their ancestral properties in hometowns and people offer newly harvested foods. Koreans hold memorial services at the grave sites of the elder people.

Koreans hold memorial services at the grave sites of the elder people. After the memorial service, they have a special meal to celebrate and be thankful for each other. In Korea, People have Ttok (rice cakes) made with the newly harvested rice.

Special foods eaten during Chu Suk are songp’yon, freshly picked fruit, toran-t’ang (taro soup) and song-i (mushrooms. Different activities for the day include masked dance, Kanggangsuwollae, an ancient circle dance and the tug-of-war game.

Another activity includes the tortoise game called Kobuk-nori, in which two men dress as a tortoise and tour the village dancing and performing for food and drink. Many activities like archery, wrestling, and singing competitions are a special attraction during the Korean harvest festival.

Kang Kang Sue Wol Lae is a traditional ceremony which is observed a night before Chu Suk. All Women gather together in circles and sing songs to mark the festival. The people thank god and each other for a bountiful harvest.

Altogether, Chu Suk is a Korean harvest festival that takes place during the harvest season and is a time to give thanks for the autumn harvest. Nubaigai is the harvest festival held in Lithuania.

In Lithuania, the Thanksgiving tradition involves the creation of a Boba which is then wrapped around the worker who bound the last sheaf. The harvest wreath is then carried on a plate covered with a white linen cloth.

As the procession moves on, people who reaped sing an old song which represents how they rescued the crop from a huge bison that tried to devour it. Malaysia is situated in the central Southeast Asia.

The Kadazan is the harvest festival of Malaysia which is celebrated in the month of May by Sabah every year to thank their favorite Rice God. The local people have given the name of “Tadau ka’amatan” to this festival.

The local people wear their traditional costumes to mark the festival. Tapai is the homemade rice wine which is distributed generously among localities. Carnivals are an important part of the festival.

People here have a belief that there is no life without Rice. People worship Bambaazon who is the overall creator and thus revere his spirit in the rice plant and cooked rice. The harvest time is a time for lots of activities, cultural programs and agricultural shows, buffalo races, and traditional games.

One of the most important harvest or thanksgiving festivals in Portugal is the ’Festa dos Tabuleiros’ which is also called ‘Festival of the Trays’. This festival takes place every four years, in the month of July.

The fiestas das Vindimias festival which is held in the beginning of September is the other traditional harvest festival in Pamela (A town and a municipality in Portugal) which is near Lisbon (Lisbon is the capital city and largest city of Portugal).

This festival lasts for 5 days. The festival includes the wine harvest and this is an excellent opportunity to get to know some of its magnificent wines. There are also good things to eat such as the famous little Azeitão cheeses.

This is a festival for all the family and it includes children’s activities, sports events, different thematic expositions, wine tastings, wine sales and evening music shows. In Scotland, the Harvest Festival usually takes place during September and they celebrate the harvest festival known as “Lammas” which means loaf mass.

A loaf of bread is made from the first wheat that is cut which is then taken to Church so that the bread is eaten for the mass. After coming back to the peoples usually men from the deep-sea fishing, there is a festival in the Scotland Isles.

St. Michael’s Mass or Michaelmas is another festival in Scotland which is held on September 29. It is fair in this festival which includes markets, games, and especially horseracing.

This Festival is associated with the color Gold, all the harvest colors, the harvest and bounty (Reward) of the land and the sacred King. ‘Harvest Festival’ as is popularly known, is one of the oldest festivals in the United Kingdom.

It began in churches in the year 1843 when Robert Hawker invited local parishioners to a special thanksgiving service at a church in Cornwall. This resulted in the custom of decorating churches with home-grown products.

There is an ancient ceremony known as the “crying of the neck” which takes place in Cornwall. In the old times, the success of crops determined the success or failure of the people. The natives of UK pleased the God of fertility by offering him the first sheaf of corn.

This was done to ensure a good harvest in the coming season. The last sheaf to be harvested is held up and blessed by the local vicar. It is said that the last sheaf of corn contains its spirit “Corn dolls” are made to symbolize Goddess of grain.

The last sheaf used to be kept through the winter and then plowed into the ground at the time of the next spring planting. During the festival, the entire community is invited for a dinner as part of the festivity. It is held every year in the month of September.

This is however not declared a national holiday. The Harvest Festival in Zambia is one of the popular and entertaining festivals celebrated in the country. The country of Zambia is located in the Central part of Africa.

The culture of the country has the great influences of the neighboring regions and the Harvest Festival of Zambia provides a glimpse of the diverse culture of the region. The Harvest Festival of Zambia is one of the interesting and popular festival and is celebrated on the 24th day of the month of February.

The festival is the celebration of the Ngoni people. The Ngoni people occupy the Eastern province of the country. The Ngoni people are believed to inhabit the region of Zambia from 1835.

The Harvest Festival in Zambia is held every year in Mutenguleni, which lies 15 km southwest of Chipata. The Festival is celebrated according to the Ngoni tradition. In the Ngoni tradition, the Paramount Ngoni chief offers the first harvest of the season.

This offering of the Paramount Ngoni chief is celebrated as the Harvest Festival in Zambia. The Harvest Festival in Zambia is also marked by local dance and music. During the festival, twelve local chefs from the Eastern Province of the country assembles at the venue with their troops of finest dancers.

These dancers perform the local dances of the region which is enjoyed by all spectators of the region. Each of these dance troops performs before the Paramount chief, and the chief selects one group as the best warrior dancers and gives them an award.

The Paramount chief not only selects the best dance troop but also takes part in dancing. The chief is offered the blood of the cow which is killed at the N’cwala and is a symbol of the first harvest food.

This offering of the blood is also considered as the blessing of the people of the region to start harvesting and eating. There are several colorful Festivals in Zambia that are the source of entertainment for the people of this region.

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Happy Thanksgiving!

Sources I Used:

http://www.softschools.com/facts/holidays/thanksgiving_facts/146/

http://www.coolest-holiday-parties.com/thanksgiving-facts.html

http://www.theholidayspot.com/thanksgiving/