Rachel Carson

Rachel Carson was born in May 27, 1907 in Springdale, Pennsylvania near the Allegheny River. It was the perfect place to fall in love with nature and that’s how she became inspired to be a writer and marine biologist.   If Rachel Carson was imagine how popular she’d be even though she was 107 years old! Imagine someone that old!

Robert and Maria Carson which were Rachel’s parents met in the winter of 1879 when they both sang at a musical social chorus. They fell in love, got married, and had children who were Marian Frazer, Robert, and Rachel.

As a little girl, Rachel helped the farm pets around the farm. She had a lot fabulous teachers. Her first great teacher was her mother Maria who loved books and music. Her mother introduced her to literature and nature while  diseases struck the town of Springdale, PA. Rachel also loved to read and write. Around age eight, Rachel wrote her first book called The Little Brown House. On April 14, 1964, she died of a heart failure after a long battle with breast cancer.

Chronology of Rachel Carson’s Life and Work

1907 May 27

Carson born in Springdale, Pa.

1918 September

Published first story in St. Nicholas Magazine

1925 -1929

Carson attends Pennsylvania College for Women; majors in science.

Carson goes to Woods Hole, MA to study marine biology.

Begins graduate work in zoology at Johns Hopkins University

1932 May

Graduates with MA in zoology from Hopkins; goes again to Woods Hole to study at Bureau of Fisheries.

1935

Writes radio scripts for Bureau of Fisheries and publishes articles on natural history of the Chesapeake Bay for The Baltimore Sun. Writes “The World of Water” later published as “Undersea” in The Atlantic Monthly, September, 1937.

Father, Robert Carson dies.

1936 -1952

Appointed Junior Aquatic Biologist with the Bureau of Fisheries, U.S. Department of Commerce. Becomes staff biologist with the US Fish and Wildlife Service,

1939

retires as editor in chief of all USFWS publications.

1937

Sister, Marian Carson Williams dies, leaving two daughters Virginia and Marjorie who live with Rachel and her mother.

1941

Under the Sea-wind. A Naturalist’s Picture of Ocean Life published by Simon& Schuster.

1947

Publishes first of five pamphlets in Conservation in Action series for USFWS.

1950

Confirmed breast tumor removed. No further treatment.

1951

The Sea Around Us., excerpted in “Profiles” of The New Yorker. The Sea Around Us published by Oxford University Press. Resigns from Government service to write full time.

1952

National Book Award for Non-fiction for The Sea Around Us; Roger Christie, Marjorie’s son born. RKO film version released; Awarded the John Burroughs Medal, April 1952. The Henry Grier Bryant Gold Medal, Geographical Society New York Zoological Society Gold Medal. Awarded a Simon Guggenheim Fellowship for research on tidal life.

1955

The Edge of the Sea published by Houghton Mifflin Co.

1956

July “Help Your Child to Wonder,” Women’s Home Companion. Published posthumously as The Sense of Wonder, Harper& Row, 1965.

1957

Rachel adopts Roger Christie after the death of his mother.

1960 April

Carson has radical mastectomy for breast cancer.

1962 June

First of three installments of Silent Spring published as Reporter at Large in The New Yorker September Silent Spring published by Houghton Mifflin December Silent Spring, a book-of-the-month club selection

1963 January

Albert Schweitzer award from Animal Welfare Institute April 3 CBS Reports airs “The Silent Spring of Rachel Carson.”

1963 June 3

Carson testifies on the misuse of pesticides; US Senate Subcommittee of Government Operations. 88th Cong. 1st.sess.

1963 June 6

Carson testifies before the US Senate Committee on Commerce December Awarded the National Audubon Society Medal. Inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

1964 April 14

Carson dies in Silver Spring, Md. at age 56.

The sources I used were:

Who on Earth is Rachel Carson by Glenn Scherer

 

Rachel Carson was born in May 27, 1907 in Springdale, Pennsylvania near the Allegheny River. It was the perfect place to fall in love with nature and that’s how she became inspired to be a writer and marine biologist.   If Rachel Carson was imagine how popular she’d be even though she was 107 years old! Imagine someone that old!

 

Robert and Maria Carson which were Rachel’s parents met in the winter of 1879 when they both sang at a musical social chorus. They fell in love, got married, and had children who were Marian Frazer, Robert, and Rachel.

 

As a little girl, Rachel helped the farm pets around the farm. She had a lot fabulous teachers. Her first great teacher was her mother Maria who loved books and music. Her mother introduced her to literature and nature while  diseases struck the town of Springdale, PA. Rachel also loved to read and write. Around age eight, Rachel wrote her first book called The Little Brown House. On April 14, 1964, she died of a heart failure after a long battle with breast cancer.

 

Chronology of Rachel Carson’s Life and Work

1907 May 27

Carson born in Springdale, Pa.

1918 September

Published first story in St. Nicholas Magazine

1925 -1929

Carson attends Pennsylvania College for Women; majors in science.

Carson goes to Woods Hole, MA to study marine biology.

Begins graduate work in zoology at Johns Hopkins University

1932 May

Graduates with MA in zoology from Hopkins; goes again to Woods Hole to study at Bureau of Fisheries.

1935

Writes radio scripts for Bureau of Fisheries and publishes articles on natural history of the Chesapeake Bay for The Baltimore Sun. Writes “The World of Water” later published as “Undersea” in The Atlantic Monthly, September, 1937.

Father, Robert Carson dies.

1936 -1952

Appointed Junior Aquatic Biologist with the Bureau of Fisheries, U.S. Department of Commerce. Becomes staff biologist with the US Fish and Wildlife Service,

1939

retires as editor in chief of all USFWS publications.

1937

Sister, Marian Carson Williams dies, leaving two daughters Virginia and Marjorie who live with Rachel and her mother.

1941

Under the Sea-wind. A Naturalist’s Picture of Ocean Life published by Simon& Schuster.

1947

Publishes first of five pamphlets in Conservation in Action series for USFWS.

1950

Confirmed breast tumor removed. No further treatment.

1951

The Sea Around Us., excerpted in “Profiles” of The New Yorker. The Sea Around Us published by Oxford University Press. Resigns from Government service to write full time.

1952

National Book Award for Non-fiction for The Sea Around Us; Roger Christie, Marjorie’s son born. RKO film version released; Awarded the John Burroughs Medal, April 1952. The Henry Grier Bryant Gold Medal, Geographical Society New York Zoological Society Gold Medal. Awarded a Simon Guggenheim Fellowship for research on tidal life.

1955

The Edge of the Sea published by Houghton Mifflin Co.

1956

July “Help Your Child to Wonder,” Women’s Home Companion. Published posthumously as The Sense of Wonder, Harper& Row, 1965.

1957

Rachel adopts Roger Christie after the death of his mother.

1960 April

Carson has radical mastectomy for breast cancer.

1962 June

First of three installments of Silent Spring published as Reporter at Large in The New Yorker September Silent Spring published by Houghton Mifflin December Silent Spring, a book-of-the-month club selection

1963 January

Albert Schweitzer award from Animal Welfare Institute April 3 CBS Reports airs “The Silent Spring of Rachel Carson.”

1963 June 3

Carson testifies on the misuse of pesticides; US Senate Subcommittee of Government Operations. 88th Cong. 1st.sess.

1963 June 6

Carson testifies before the US Senate Committee on Commerce December Awarded the National Audubon Society Medal. Inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

1964 April 14

Carson dies in Silver Spring, Md. at age 56.

The sources I used were:

 

Who on Earth is Rachel Carson by Glenn Scherer

 

 

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Ball Kick Game

Ball Kick Game

The point of the whole game is to see how many bounces you can do before the ball rolls away. Beat your record!

What you’ll need:

A Medium Playground Ball
A Safe Outdoor Area
A kneecap
A hand
Practice
A Stopwatch
1 or more player(s)

How You Play:

1. Hold your ball in your hand.
2. Set the stopwatch.
3. Bounce the ball once.
4. Quickly put your knee cap below the ball.
5. Put your knee down.
6. Put your hands in front of you to catch the ball.

7. Repeat steps #2, #3, #4, and #5!

Compare who got the highest time if doing it with more people.

The reward is up to you! You don’t have to have a reward.

Here are some ideas for the reward:

Ice Cream
Movie
Restaurant
Have a day off
Sleep

That’s all the ideas!

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The Upside Down “V” Stretch

My mother Camilla thinks it looks like a “A”. I did this stretch last night.

Here’s what you need:

Strong legs and hands

Instructions:

1. Put your feet 5 hands apart and put your hands 5 hands apart but above the feet.

2.Then slowly let your legs collapse along with your hands.

3. Rest a few minutes then repeat as much as you like.

May hurt your legs a little. Might hear ankle pop.

*Especially met for gymnastic people.

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Tiger

Facts: The largest of all the Asian big cats, tigers rely primarily on sight and sound rather than smell. They typically hunt alone and stalk prey. A tiger can consume up to 88 pounds of meat at one time. On average, tigers give birth to 2-3 cubs every 2-2.5 years. If all the cubs in one litter die, a second litter may be produced within 5 months.

Tigers generally gain independence at two years of age and attain sexual maturity at 3-4 years for females and at 4-5 years for males. Juvenile mortality is high however—about half of all cubs do not survive more than two years. Tigers have been known to reach the age of 26 years in the wild. Across their range, tigers face unrelenting pressure from poaching, retaliatory killings and habitat loss. They are forced to compete for space with dense and often growing human populations.

Explanation: The animal pictures Billie sent made me get the idea!

Photos:

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Green Hair streaked Butterfly

Facts:

An endangered butterfly, the Green Hairstreak Butterfly is isolated to three small parts of the city: Hawk Hill Park,Rocky Outcrop Park, and a small portion of the Presidio. Green Hairstreak larvae feed exclusively on the Coastal Buckwheat and conservation projects have focused on creating a corridor of these plants to “bridge” the three populations and prevent inbreeding. There are 50 green hair streaked butterflies left!

Explanation: Thomas just looked randomly and came along this.

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Guinea Pig

Facts:

Guinea pigs are tail-less rodents that are native to the west coast of South America and since the mid-1800′s, laboratories have used them for research. The correct name for guinea pigs is Cavy, pronounced “kay-vee”.
Guinea pigs usually weigh around 3 ounces at birth, around 1-2 pounds full grown, and live for 5-6 years. An adult will measure 8-10 inches from the tip of its nose to the end of its rump. Their hair comes in a wide range of colors and the hair may be long, short or short and curly. Cavies have a very good sense of smell and sensitive hearing. They love to vocalize with squeals, chirps, squeaks, and whistles. Although not known for their intelligence, they do recognize their owners and will seek them out and return affection.

Explanation: Lovey wanted this because she doesn’t have another guinea pig friend and she’s worried about other guinea pigs.

Notice: Guinea pigs aren’t endangered!

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