A Friendly Letter To Robert Frost

Hi there! I am typing a friendly letter to Robert Frost who has past away. I’m doing this for fun. Below is where it begins.

Hey there, Robert Frost!

I had no idea that you live in New Hampshire. I loved your winter poems and some of the other poems you wrote. I hope you love New Hampshire! I’ve heard it’s beautiful there!

I like poetry and I know you like reading because you are technically an author. Take your time to read this. Enjoy a nice day!

Best wishes,

Lillian

P.S. My family says hello.

Thanks for reading this friendly letter!

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In The Good Ole SummerTime (Lillian’s Version)

Hi y’all, remember this song?

Lyrics to The Good Ole Summer Time (Lillian’s Version)

Chorus:

In the good ole summer time
In the good ole summer time

(Repeat Chorus x1)

We used to eat summer food
We used to eat summer food
Go to bed early
Go to bed early

Repeat Chorus x2

Go to bed early in the good ole summertime.
Go to bed early in the good ole summertime.

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American Tree Sparrows

Hi there! My mother, Camilla suggested that I write a series of posts about birds on my blog since I’ve been talking about them and learning about them. Please let me know if you have any bird books, CDs, or a website you’d recommend! Here is the part about American Tree Sparrows.

American Tree Sparrows are small, round-headed birds that often fluff out their feathers, making their plump bodies look even chubbier. Like other sparrows, they have fairly small bills and long, thin tails. Their color pattern is a rusty cap and rusty (not black) eyeline on a gray head, a streaked brown back, and a smooth gray to buff breast in both male and female American Tree Sparrows give an overall impression of reddish-brown and gray. A dark smudge in the center of the unstreaked breast is common.

Small flocks of American Tree Sparrows hop about on the ground, scrabbling for grass and weed seeds, calling back and forth with a soft, musical twitter that might make you twitter, sing, or dance. A single American Tree Sparrow may perch in the open top of goldenrod stalks or shrubs, or on low tree branches. Look for small flocks of American Tree Sparrows in the winter in weedy fields with hedgerows or shrubs, along forest edges, or near marshes except for Reno, NV. They readily visit backyards, especially if there’s a seed feeder.

American Tree Sparrows breed in the far north and are hardly seen south of northern Canada in the summer. 4-6, usually 5. Pale bluish or greenish, with brownish spotting often concentrated at larger end. Incubation is by female, 11-13 days; male visits nest often, but does not incubate. Young: Both parents feed nestlings. Young leave nest at age 8-10 days, when flight feathers not yet fully grown.

Parents may lure them away from nest by offering food. Young are able to fly at about 14-15 days after hatching; parents continue to feed them for about 2 more weeks. 1 brood per season, but may attempt to renest if 1st attempt fails. Diet in the winter is almost entirely seeds, from grasses, weeds, and other plants; also a few insects and berries.

In the summer, they eat mostly insects and other small invertebrates, plus a few seeds. Young are fed mostly insects. Pairs form shortly after birds arrive on breeding grounds. Male actively defends territory, chasing away other members of same species.

Nest site is on or near ground, in grass clumps beneath shrubs. Sometimes on hummock in open tundra; rarely up to 4′ above ground in willow or spruce. Nest is an open cup of twigs, grasses, moss, lined with fine grass and with feathers (usually ptarmigan feathers). Female builds nest in about 7 days.

All wintering areas are well to the south of breeding areas. Migrates relatively late in fall and early in spring. Apparently, migrates mainly at night. On average, females winter somewhat farther south than males.

The American Tree Sparrow is a small sparrow with a long notched tail. The adult has a streaked back and wings, with two white wing bars, but is otherwise unstreaked, while the juvenile is streaky overall. Adults have an unstreaked gray-brown breast and belly, with a dark spot in the center. The tail, rump, and nape of the neck are all solid gray.

The upper mandible of the bill is dark and the lower is yellow. The head is mostly gray, with a rufous crown and eye-line. American tree sparrows (Spizella arborea) breed throughout almost all of Alaska, the Yukon and Northwest territories, the very north of Manitoba and Ontario, all of Labrador, and in northern Quebec. Their winter range includes a very small part of southern Canada and all of the United States except for the western most 250 miles, the southern most 450 miles and all of Florida.

American tree sparrows usually breed near the tree line in open scrubby areas with willows, birches, alder thickets or stunted spruce. They may also breed in open tundra with scattered shrubs, often near lakes or bogs. They spend the winter in open forests, gardens, fields, and marshes. Baumgartner followed birds for the first 22 days of development.

Order of hatching was not dependent on the order of laying. Earlier hatched birds took the lead in development. During the nine and one-half days in the nest, the four feather tracts of the birds (dorsal, ventral, alar, caudal) go from completely bare to the back covered, lower belly slightly bare, wings 2/3 grown, and tail still a stub, and the birds grow from 1.62 gm to 16.7 gm, while their length goes from 33 mm to 75 mm during the same period. They lose 1.5 gm the first day out of the egg but have gained 3 gm by day 21 (Baumgartner, 1968).

On the second day after hatching the young were able to stretch for food. On the fourth day their eyes were half open, after the fifth day, wide open. The first sounds were made on the fifth day but were very soft. Fear was acquired between 7.5 and 8 days as demonstrated by their raucous calls when touched by humans.

During the first 12 days of the fledgling period (which lasts until about a month after leaving the nest in (Spizella arborea) the birds showed a steady increase in both tail length (14-47mm) and wing length (46-68mm). At the end of the first 21 days the wings were still slightly shorter and the tails about 2/3 the length of mature birds. A tree sparrow was observed to fly 30 or 40 ft fifteen days after hatching, and a little before one month after hatching, the birds could fly all around their territory. American tree sparrows are monogamous (one male mates with one female).

Males and females form breeding pairs after they arrive at the breeding sites in the spring. Both males and female sing to attract a mate. Females become excited when males come to sing nearby. They call back to the male, making a “wehy” sound.

Males may show off for females by spreading their wings and fluttering them or darting to the ground in front of the female, then flying back up to a perch. American tree sparrows breed between May and September. They raise one brood of chicks each year. The females builds the nest alone.

The nests are built on the ground out of moss, grasses, bark and twigs. They are lined with fine grass and feathers.The female then lays about 5 eggs. She lays one egg each day.

She incubates the eggs for 10 to 14 days and broods the chicks after they hatch. The chicks are altricial (helpless) when they hatch, so they rely on the female to protect them and keep them warm. Both parents feed the chicks until 2 to 3 weeks after the chicks leave the nest (called fledging). The young fledge from the nest about 9 days after hatching.

In late summer, the families join larger flocks. We do not know when young American tree sparrows begin breeding.
American tree sparrows breed once per year. Females incubate the eggs and brood the chicks after they hatch.

Both parents feed the chicks until they are about 22 days old. The oldest known American tree sparrow lived at least 10 years and 9 months. Most American tree sparrows probably live about 2.3 to 3.4 years. American tree sparrows are migratory.

Though they are usually active during the day (called diurnal), they migrate at night. American tree sparrows are territorial during the breeding season. Males sing to claim territories and they defend their territories from others. Females occasionally chase intruders too.

American tree sparrows do not defend winter territories. During the winter, they form large flocks that forage together. Within these flocks, some birds are dominant over other birds. American tree sparrows move by hopping on the ground and on branches, and by flying.

They do not swim or dive, but they do bath frequently. They roost alone trees or shrubs, haystacks, cornfields, and marshes. In the winter, they might take shelter together under the snow. American tree sparrows are omnivorous; they eat many different seeds, berries and insects.

During the winter, American tree sparrows mainly eat grass and weed seeds. During the summer, they mostly eat insects and spiders. American tree sparrows search for food among plants on the ground and the branches and twigs of shrubs and trees. In Massachusetts, they are often seen in flocks, feeding at bird feeders.

American tree sparrows need to drink a lot of water each day. During the winter, they eat snow in order to get enough water. Known predators of American tree sparrows include northern goshawks, sharp-shinned hawks, screech owls, pygmy owls, Cooper’s hawks, American kestrels, weasels, foxes, and red squirrels. When approached by humans, American tree sparrows give a rapid series of “tset” calls.

It is unknown how American tree sparrows respond to other potential predators. American tree sparrows are very important members of the food chain. They eat many weed seeds and insects and spiders, and they are an important food source for their predators.

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Sources I Used:

http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Mountain_Bluebird/id

http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/mountain-bluebird

http://www.nhptv.org/natureworks/mountainbluebird.htm

http://www.statesymbolsusa.org/symbol-official-item/idaho/state-bird/mountain-bluebird

http://identify.whatbird.com/obj/581/overview/Mountain_Bluebird.aspx

http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/infocenter/i7680id.html

http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/california_quail/id

http://www.nhptv.org/natureworks/californiaquail.htm

http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/california-quail

http://dwrcdc.nr.utah.gov/rsgis2/search/Display.asp?FlNm=callcali

http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/American_Tree_Sparrow/id

http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/american-tree-sparrow

http://birdweb.org/birdweb/bird/american_tree_sparrow

http://www.biokids.umich.edu/critters/Spizella_arborea/

http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Song_Sparrow/id

http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/song-sparrow

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Books I Recommend: The Trolls by Polly Horvath

Hi there! This is the 23rd book recommendation list. I truly appreciate  everyone excluding strangers. I know that this is a lot of books to look through but you can take your time if needed. Thanks so much!

1. The Trollsby Polly Horvath
2. Hamster Magicby Lynne Jonell
3. Farmer Boyby Laura Ingalls Wilder
4.Gifts from the Seaby Natalie Kinsley-Warnock
5.Addy’s Little Brotherby Connie Porter
6. Honey Cakeby Joan Betty Stuchner
7. My Life as a Bookby Janet Tashjian
8. Oh, The Places He Wentby Maryann N. Weich
9. Saigeby Jessie Hass
10. Iridessa, Lost at Seaby Disney
11. Myka Finds Her Wayby Disney
12. Man Tripby Graham Salisbury
13. Trouble Magnetby Graham Salisbury
14. Thea Stilton and the Star Castawaysby Geronimo Stilton
15. The Canoe Trip Mysteryby Gertrude Chandler Warner
16. May Blossom of Britanniaby Anna Kirwan
17. The Girl Who Chased the Moonby Sarah Addison Allen
18. Secrets At Seaby Richard Peck
19. The Teacher’s Funeralby Richard Peck
20. Soupby Robert Newton Peck
21. On Pins and Needlesby Chloe Taylor
22. The Bus Station Mysteryby Gertrude Chandler Warner
23. The Friendshipby Mildred D. Taylor
24. Breathing Roomby Marsha Hayles
25. Clover Twig and the Magical Cottageby Kaye Umansky
26. Clover Twig and the Magical Cottageby Pam Muñoz Ryan

(Amazon affiliates)

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Latest News: California Quail

Hi there! My mother, Camilla, suggested that I write a series of posts about birds on my blog since I’ve been talking about them and learning about them. Please let me know if you have any bird books, CDs, or a website you’d recommend! Here is the part about California Quail.

California Quail are plump, short-necked game birds with a small head and bill. They fly on short, very broad wings. The tail is fairly long and square. Both sexes have a comma-shaped topknot of feathers projecting forward from the forehead, longer in males than females. Adult males are rich gray and brown, with a black face outlined with bold white stripes. Females are a plainer brown and lack the facial markings. Both genders have a pattern of white, creamy, and chestnut scales on the belly. Young birds look like females but have a shorter topknot.

California Quail spend most of their time on the ground, walking and scratching in search of food. In morning and evening they forage beneath shrubs or on open ground near cover. They usually travel in groups called coveys. Their flight is explosive but lasts just long enough to reach cover.

You’ll find California Quail in chaparral, sagebrush, oak woodlands, and foothill forests of California and the Northwest. They’re quite tolerant of people and can be common in city parks, suburban gardens, and agricultural areas. The California quail is a small, plump bird with a short black beak. The male has a gray chest and brown back and wings. It has a black throat with white stripes and a brown cap on its head. The female has a gray or brown head and back and a lighter speckled chest and belly. Both the male and the female have a curved black crown feather on their foreheads. The male’s crown feather is larger than the female’s.

The California quail is sometimes called the valley quail. The California quail eats seeds, plant parts like buds and sometimes insects. They feed in flocks in the early morning. The California quail can be found from southern Oregon to southern California and east into Nevada. The California quail lives in grasslands, foothills, woodlands, canyons and at the edge of deserts. It likes areas with lots of brush. The California quail lives in coveys of 10 to 200 birds in the winter.

They will stay in these flocks until they pair off during mating season. Male California quails will perch on a tree or post and call out to claim their territory. The California quail will roost in trees to avoid danger and to rest. Males often compete for a mate. They will mate with only one female. Females usually lay between 12-16 cream and brown speckled eggs. Their nest is a shallow hollow or scrape in the ground that is lined with grass. The female incubates the eggs for about three weeks. Both parents will care for the chicks. The chicks leave the nest shortly after birth. They make their first attempts at flight when they are about 10 days old. They will stay on the ground for about a month and then will roost in trees with the rest of the flock.

The female usually has one brood a year. This sharply-marked bird with the curving topknot is common along the California coast and in a few other areas of the west. It has adapted rather well to the increasing human population, and is often found around well-wooded suburbs and even large city parks. California Quail live in coveys at most seasons, and are often seen strutting across clearings, nodding their heads at each step. If disturbed, they may burst into fast low flight on whirring wings.

The California Quail is a gray, ground-dwelling bird, more slender than most other quail. It has a light breast with scaled patterning, white streaks along brown sides, and black and gray scaling on the nape of the neck. The female has a tan head with a small feather plume. The male has a bold black face outlined in white, with a brown crown and a pendulous feather plume hanging forward from his forehead.

The California quail, California’s state bird, is a 9-11 inch hen-like bird with a distinctive teardrop-shaped head plume called a top-knot. Their plump bodies vary from grayish to brown with scaly markings on the lower breast and abdomen. Males are particularly elegant with a black throat, chestnut patch on the belly, a bluish gray breast, white speckles on its flanks, and a white stripe on the forehead and around the neckline. Females have a smaller top-knot and lack the male’s distinctive facial markings and black throat.
Her crest is dark brown and her body is brown or gray with white speckles on the chest and belly. The marked sexual dimorphism is believed to play an important part in breeding displays. Juveniles resemble the female, but have shorter and lighter colored crests. As ground dwelling birds, their short and powerful legs are well adapted for terrestrial locomotion. They can fly rapidly, but only for short distances. When alarmed they prefer to run, flying only as a last resort.

California quail are best adapted to semiarid environments, ranging from sea level to 4000 feet and occasionally up to 8500 feet or higher (Sumner 1935). As long as there is abundant food, ground cover, and a dependable water source, quail are able to live in a variety of habitats including open woodlands, brushy foothills, desert washes, forest edge, chaparral, stream valleys, agricultural lands, and suburb areas. Cover is needed for roosting, resting, nesting, escaping from predators, and for protection from the weather (Sumner 1935, Leopold 1977).

Leopold (1977) separates California quail habitat areas into four major ecological zones arid ranges mostly in Southern California and Baja California, transitional ranges in the Sacramento Valley, humid forest ranges associated with the Coast and Cascade ranges, and interior Great Basin and Columbia Basin ranges. Of these the transitional ranges in the Sacramento Valley foothills provide the most stable quail habitat, characterized by mild winters, moderate rainfall, moderately dense ground vegetation, and generally adequate ground cover.

California quail are generalists and opportunists, so food intake varies by location and season. Their main food items are seeds produced by various species of broad-leafed annual plants, especially legumes. This includes plants such as lupine (Lupinus sp.), clover (Trifolium sp.), bur clover (Medicago sp.), and deer vetches (Lotus sp.) (Leopold 1977). Their bills are typical for seedeaters: serrated, short, stout, and slightly decurved.

Shields and Duncan (1966) studied California quail diet in the fall and winter during a dry year on the San Joaquin Experimental Range in the central Sierra Nevada foothills. They found that seeds comprised 82% of their diet, while green leafage contributed 18%. Duncan (1968) also studied quail diet in the same area and found that legume seeds were their most important food item. Quail also eat leafy materials, acorns, fruits and berries, crop residues, and some insects (Leopold 1977).

During the fall and winter, California quail are highly gregarious birds, gathering into groups, called coveys. In most situations, covey size averages about 50 birds, but under intensive management and protection, coveys can get as large as 1000 birds (Leopold 1977). In the covey, the quail tend to imitate one another and exhibit cooperative behavior. For example, when one bird finds a good supply of food it often calls the others to it. Likewise, when a member of the covey perceives danger it will warn the group with the appropriate call (Sumner 1935).

California quail communicate with 14 different calls (Leopold, 1977). This includes courtship, re-grouping, feeding, and warning calls. The most frequently heard location call has been described as “cu-ca-cow” or “chi-ca-go.” At the start of nesting season in early spring the coveys break up, as quail pairs spread themselves out into different habitat areas to nest and rear their young.

At the end of summer each new quail family rejoins the others to form a new covey where they will remain until the next breeding season. Emlen (1939) observed this seasonal movement in his study of California quail on a 760-acre farm in the vicinity of Davis, California. In the winter, four coveys, containing 21-46 birds, had home ranges of 17-45 acres, roughly one acre for each bird. The covey locations and range size depended on the amount of brush cover available. The four territories were separated by 350 yards to half a mile and contact between the coveys was infrequent.

The members of a covey tended to feed and roost together in mid-winter, but occasionally they broke up into smaller units. Winter movements were restricted with only 5 to 10 acres of an entire territory utilized by the covey on any one day. The same area would serve as a feeding ground for a few days to two or three weeks when the birds would move to another part of their territory. The California quail is common to states of the Pacific coast. They were first introduced into Utah in 1869.

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Sources I Used:

http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Mountain_Bluebird/id

http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/mountain-bluebird

http://www.nhptv.org/natureworks/mountainbluebird.htm

http://www.statesymbolsusa.org/symbol-official-item/idaho/state-bird/mountain-bluebird

http://identify.whatbird.com/obj/581/overview/Mountain_Bluebird.aspx

http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/infocenter/i7680id.html

http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/california_quail/id

http://www.nhptv.org/natureworks/californiaquail.htm

http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/california-quail

http://dwrcdc.nr.utah.gov/rsgis2/search/Display.asp?FlNm=callcali

http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/American_Tree_Sparrow/id

http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/american-tree-sparrow

http://birdweb.org/birdweb/bird/american_tree_sparrow

http://www.biokids.umich.edu/critters/Spizella_arborea/

http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Song_Sparrow/id

http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/song-sparrow

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Books I Recommend: Waterbirds by David Chandler

Hi there! This is the 22nd book recommendation list.

1. Waterbirds by David Chandler
2. Eagles by Rebecca L. Grambo
3. The Fortune-Tellersby Lloyd Alexander
4. Arizonaby Mari Kesselring
5. Leprechaun Goldby Teresa Baterman
6. Thanksgiving All Aroundby Mike Berenstain
7. Miracles on Maple Hillby Virginia Sorensen
8. Esperanza Risingby Pam Muñoz Ryan
9. Hope the Happiness Fairyby Daisy Meadows
10. Cassidy the Costume Fairyby Daisy Meadows
11. Anya the Cuddly Creatures Fairyby Daisy Meadows
12. Elisa the Royal Adventure Fairyby Daisy Meadows
13. Lizzie the Sweet Treats Fairy: A Rainbow Magic Bookby Daisy Meadows
14. Maddie the Fun and Games Fairyby Daisy Meadows
15. Eva the Enchanted Ball Fairyby Daisy Meadows
16. Cinderella Stays Lateby Joan Holub & Suzanne Willams
17. Secret Admirerby Jane O’Conner
18. Tofu Quiltby Ching Yeung Russell
19. The Mystery Girlby Gertrude Warner Chandler
20. Dying to Meet Youby Kate Klise
21. Doggone It!by Nancy Krulik
22. Any Way You Slice Itby Nancy Krulik
23. Going Overboard!by Nancy Krulik
24. Fern the Green Fairyby Daisy Meadows
25. Fira and the Full Moonby Disney

(amazon affilates)

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Life as An Autumn Gold Apple

Hi there! This may help you learn more about the apple. You are about to enter a life of an apple that you might know about.

I was born as a seed in November 19, 1900. Until spring arrived, I slept. When I woke up, I was a tree.

I grew apples and people came and picked the apples off of me. So the people made new seeds. After my apples were gone, everyone sat under me.

I felt loved until autumn. The leaves started falling off me for the kids to play with. Finally, winter came and I fell asleep.

When I woke up again, I had apple blossoms on me. Then, I grew more apples. Meanwhile, the seeds from my apples were young trees and they did the same thing.

As I got older, more people were able to play on me. One day, I got so old no one was able to play with me. That night, a strong thunderstorm tore one of my branches.

So they had to cut me down. They had a funeral for me. I was 49 years old. From then on, the people used my stump as something useful.

The other trees lived to be 100 years old. To this day, my apples are all over the world. So whenever you eat an autumn gold apple, just remember this story.

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I got this photo at Google Images but the main place it came from was http://m.recipetips.com/glossary-term/t–38648/crimson-gold-apple.asp.

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Latest News: Research on Forgiveness

Hi there! Camilla assigned to me to do research on forgiveness and apologies last week and I just finished it. I worked on it really hard and it begins below.

Here’s the definition for apology:

An apology tells someone that we’re sorry for what we did even if we mean it on purpose. It’s a way of saying we’re aware of what we did and we’ll try to do better in the future. Here’s why apologizing is important: Apologies are one of the tools we use to build good friendships and relationships. When someone says “I’m sorry” (and really mean it), it’s because you would probably feel bad or guilty
that something you did or said hurt or harmed someone.

Saying you’re sorry is
more than just words. You’re also saying that you respect the other
person and you care about his or her feelings. Apologizing shows you have empathy. After apologizing, you might feel a little better.

The other person probably will, too. When you apologize in a caring way, you can feel good because you are trying to make things right again. Everyone needs to apologize (even adults) when they do something wrong. By doing the right thing and saying “I’m sorry,” parents and other adults set an example.

That example is how kids and teenagers learn to apologize when they absolutely need to. When someone apologizes to you, you may welcome it and be ready to forgive whatever happened and move on or you might not feel like being friendly again right away. If a person keeps hurting you and apologizing without making an effort to change, you might not want to hang out with that person anymore. Apologies and forgiveness are important because intractable conflicts generate such deep and searing emotions.

Even after the fighting stops, people still feel the pain, hurt, anger, fear, and hatred that produced the conflict and its horrors in the first place. Without apology and forgiveness, people remain locked in the value systems that produced the conflict. Little progress beyond a ceasefire can be made. For some people, apologizing feels like an admission that they are inadequate–that, rather than having made a mistake, there is something inherently wrong with them.

Some people believe that offering the first apology after an argument is an admission of guilt and responsibility for the entirety of a conflict that involved wrongs on the part of both parties; they think an apology from them will allow the other person to take no responsibility for their own part in the conflict. Sometimes an apology seems to call added attention to a mistake that may have gone unnoticed. However, in the right circumstances, a well-delivered, appropriately sincere apology will generally avoid all of these issues, and will merely serve to usher in a resolution, reaffirm shared values, and restore positive feelings. You just have to know when and how to deliver your apology.

You can hurt yourself by hitting, sore throat or falling when you have a meltdown. The each culture or person has its own language. This is how Spanish people say sorry: ¡Lo Siento! This is how Russian people say sorry: Prastite/Izvinite Простите/ Извините

This is how Vietnamese people say sorry: Xin lỗi! Forgiveness, as you may have heard or experienced, is simply the act of letting go of the burden that you carry from another person who has hurt you out of their own pain, ignorance, or confusion. It’s a practice of freeing up your energy to focus on things that incline toward your own health and well-being or the health and well-being of others. There’s a saying: “Not forgiving is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to get hurt or die.”

The reality is holding onto resentment literally keeps our cortisol running and makes us sick. The wonderful thing about forgiveness is it really only takes one to tango. You only need one person to forgive—you! You don’t even need the offender.

Right now, if you have someone you’re holding a grudge against or are resenting, imagine the two of you tied together in a tug of war and imagine the cord being cut…you no longer have the tension of the rope, you are free! Of course it’s not often this easy and it’s a practice to forgive, but what else is there to do? Hold onto the resentment so we continue to suffer? We’ve already been hurt, why continue to inflict further suffering on ourselves?

“Forgiveness does not change the past, but it does enlarge the future.”—Paul Boese If you are open to letting go of the resentment-habit and opening up to a better future, play with the following short forgiveness practice from The Now Effect: Allow this to be a choice point to practice forgiveness. Think of someone who has hurt you or caused you pain (maybe not the person who has hurt you most) whom you are holding a grudge against right now. Visualize the time you had been hurt by this person and feel the pain you still carry.

Hold tightly to your unwillingness to forgive. Now observe what emotion you are feeling. Is it anger, resentment, sadness? Also use your body as a barometer and notice physically what you feel.

Are you tense anywhere or feeling heavy? Now bring awareness to your thoughts; are they hateful, spiteful thoughts? Feel this burden that lives inside when you hold so tightly to past hurts. Now ask yourself, “Who is suffering?

Have I carried this burden long enough? Am I willing to forgive?” If not, that is okay, perhaps the time will come when you’re ready. If you are ready, practice “Breathing in, I acknowledge the pain, breathing out, forgiving and releasing this burden from my heart and mind.”

Continue this as long as it is supportive to you. Remind yourself that it takes courage to forgive and so allow this to be a part of your new story. Sometime’s it hard to break out of the habit of not apologizing and it’s easy to get into the habit of not apologizing. Here’s 2 illustrations below this sentence.

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Sources I Used:

http://m.kidshealth.org/teen/school_jobs/good_friends/apologies.html#a_Does_Apologizing_Fix_Everything_

http://mobile.linguanaut.com/?url=http%253A%252F%252Fwww.linguanaut.com%252Fenglish_russian.htm&dm_redirected=true%232903

http://www.mindful.org/mindful-voices/on-mental-health/learn-to-forgive-others-no-matter-what

http://www.beyondintractability.org/essay/apology-forgiveness

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Latest Weather: Thunderstorms

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Hi there! I decided to do thunderstorms for my weekly research and I thought that this time of year would be perfect. I’d like to thank my mother Camilla for making this possible.

A thunderstorm is a storm with lightning and thunder. It is produced by a cumulonimbus cloud, usually producing gusty winds, heavy rain and sometimes hail but not always in the Western USA. The basic ingredients used to make a thunderstorm are moisture, unstable air and lift.

The earth needs moisture to form clouds and rain. You need unstable air that is relatively warm and can rise rapidly. Finally, you need lift.

The lift can form from fronts, sea breezes or mountains. Thunderstorms can occur year-round and at all hours. But they are most likely to happen in the spring and summer months and during the afternoon and evening hours.

Some people estimated that there are around 1,800 thunderstorms that occur across our planet every day. All thunderstorms are dangerous. Every thunderstorm produces lightning, which kills more people each year than tornadoes.

Thunder is the sound caused by lightning. The intense heat from lightning causes the surrounding air to rapidly expand and create a sonic wave that you hear as thunder. The average temperature of lightning is around 20000°C (36000°F).

The sound of thunder can be anything from a loud crack to a low rumble. Light travels faster than sound so we see lightning before we hear thunder. The closer you live, the shorter the gap between the lightning and thunder.

The speed of sound is around 767 miles per hour (1,230 kilometres per hour). The speed of light is around 669600000 miles per hour (1080000000 kilometres per hour). Thunder is difficult to hear at distances over 12 miles (20 kilometres).

Thousands of years ago, philosophers such as Aristotle believed that thunder was caused by the collision of clouds. Astraphobia is the fear of thunder and lightning. The Oklahoma basketball team that play in the National Basketball Association (NBA) are called the Thunder.

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I got this photo at http://www.top10spy.com/wp-content/uploads/Thunderstorms-Ever-Recorded.jpg but I actually found it on Google Images.

Sources I Used:

http://www.weatherwizkids.com/weather-thunderstorms

http://www.sciencekids.co.nz/sciencefacts/weather/thunder.html

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A Friendship Story: A Friendship Between 4 Types of Candy

Hi there! This story will be for friendship. It should be helpful. You are about to enter a story about 4 candies friendship with a moral.

Jellybean went walking and found his friend Rocky (also known as Rock Candy). So Jellybean told him his wish of how he wanted to be seen. After that, Rocky set off to help his friend with a flyer. Shortly after, he ran into Orange Slice.

So he told Orange all about it. Before long, Orange set off to help Jellybean. After that, the candies became desperate and determined to help Jellybean.

A few days later, they ran into Jellybean and they told him their plan and he liked it. The plan was to let Jellybean do funny tricks. In 2 days, they put on a show.

In just 2 months, he got extremely popular. He was happy that his wish came true. From that day, they became best friends.

The moral of that story was if you wish something badly and you tell someone. Chances are you might just get your wish. Wasn’t that a great story?

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I found this photo on Google Images although this photo was really on http://www.economycandy.com/index.php?dispatch=products.view&product_id=753

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