How The Sun Came To Be

Hey, everyone! You’re about to enter an interview with Lady Weather. Here are some other weather-related blog posts: http://lilliandarnell.com/2018/02/02/how-rain-came-to-be-natures-glitter/ and http://lilliandarnell.com/2015/06/05/latest-weather-thunderstorms/. I hope you enjoy!

Lady Wendy Weather: Welcome to Sunny Fields! Are you ready to get started, Mrs. Alice?

Alice: Thank you! Please just call me Alice, Lady Wendy Weather. Yes, I’m so thrilled to get started!

Lady Wendy Weather: Ok then. By the way, please just call me Wendy. Here’s the first question: How did the sun evolve?

Alice: Scientists believe that the sun and the foundation of the solar system were made from an enormous, changing cloud of gas and particles known as the solar nebula. As the nebula gave away because of the force the nebula had, the nebula rotated faster and grew into a disk. A lot of the matter was dragged to the center to create the sun we see today.

Lady Wendy Weather: Wow, that’s very important. How are the sun and its atmosphere divided?

Alice: The sun and its environment are divided into individual zones and bands. The solar center, from the interior out, is formed up of the heart, radiative zone, and the convective zone. The solar air over that consists of the photosphere, chromosphere, a development region and the corona. Behind that is the solar wind, an outpouring of gas from the corona.

Lady Wendy Weather: That’s very informational! How strong is the magnetic field? What is a flare?

Alice: The power of the sun’s magnetic field is usually only about twice as powerful as Earth’s field. Nonetheless, the sun becomes extremely concentrated in small areas, leading up to three thousand times powerful than normal. These difficulties and twists in the magnetic field happen because the sun revolves more swiftly at the tropics than at the larger latitudes and because the internal parts of the sun revolve faster than the exterior. These distortions form features varying from sunspots to thrilling explosions known as flares and coronal mass ejections. Flares are the most powerful eruptions in the solar system, while coronal mass ejections are less powerful but require remarkable amounts of matter which can make a particular ejection spout approximately 20 billion tons (18 billion metric tons) of matter into space.

Lady Wendy Weather: That’s very impressive! Next question: What is the sun made of?

Alice: That is a hard question but luckily I have the answer for you. Here is the answer: Just like utmost additional stars, the sun is formed essentially of hydrogen, accompanied with helium. Nearly all the leftover matter consists of 7 other parts which are oxygen, carbon, neon, nitrogen, magnesium, iron, and silicon. For every 1, 000, 000 molecules of hydrogen in the sun, there are ninety-eight thousand of helium in the sun, eight-hundred fifty of oxygen in the sun, three-hundred sixty of carbon in the sun, a hundred twenty of neon in the sun, a hundred ten of nitrogen in the sun, forty of magnesium in the sun, thirty five of iron in the sun,  and thirty five of silicon. Still, hydrogen is considered the lightest of all elements, so it only values for about seventy-two percent of the sun’s core, while helium forms about twenty-six percent of the sun’s core.

Lady Wendy Weather: How fascinating! What are sunspots? Do solar cycles have anything to do with sunspots?

Alice: Sunspots are comparatively cool, hidden features on the sun’s exterior that are usually approximately circular. Sunspots surface where thick bunches of magnetic field lines from the sun’s inside cut through the surface. Yes, solar cycles have a lot to do with sunspots. The amount of sunspots modifies as solar magnetic activity does and the difference in this number, from a minimum of none to a maximum of about two-hundred-fifty sunspots or bunches of sunspots and then back to a minimum, is identified as the solar cycle, and norms about eleven cycles long. At the end of a cycle, the magnetic field quickly changes its polarity.

Lady Wendy Weather: Wow, very impressive! Are you ready to wrap today’s interview up?

Alice; Most definitely. See you again soon, everyone!

Lady Wendy Weather: Bye, Alice. That’s a wrap for Sunny Fields’ interview. See you next time!

Website Source I Used:

https://www.space.com/58-the-sun-formation-facts-and-characteristics.html