Books I Recommend: Buffalo Bird Girl by S. D. Nelson

Hey, everyone! This is my 44th book recommendation. I hope you enjoy!

1. Buffalo Bird Girl by S. D. Nelson

2. Jack by Tomie DePaola

3. Welcome to Kit’s World by Harriet Brown

4. Dancing Shoes by Noel Streatfield

5. Ruby the Red Fairy by Daisy Meadows

6. Ava the Sunset Fairy by Daisy Meadows

7. Delicious by Susan Goldman Rubin

8. Beezus and Ramona by Beverly Cleary

9. The Highest and Lowest by Katie Marsico

10. Florence the Friendship Fairy by Daisy Meadows

11. Wild Boy by Mary Losure

12. Wyoming by G.S. Prentzas

13. Montana by R. Conrad Stein

14. J. K. Rowling by Victoria Peterson Hilleque

15.  My Book of Birds by Geraldo Valério

16. Lives of the Writers by Kathleen Krull

17. The Greatest Treasure by Demi

18. The Patchwork Quilt by Valerie Flournoy

19. Colorado by Barbara A. Somervill

20. Ohio by Darlene R. Stille

21. Talking With Tebé by Mary E. Lyons

22. Girls Think of Everything by Catherine Thimmesh

23. Nelson Mandela by Beatrice Gormley

24. Nobel’s Women of Peace by Michelle Benjamin and Maggie Mooney

25. Modern Art Adventures by Maja Pitamic and Jill Laidlaw

26. Humidity by Kristin Schuetz

27. Diana, Princess of Wales by Beatrice Gormley

28. The Ghost Wind Stallion by Emma Carlson Berne

29. The Trouble Begins At 8 by Sid Fleischman

30. Oprah Winfrey by Ilene Cooper

31. Clara Schumann by Susanna Reich

32. Name That Style by Bob Raczka

33.  Drawing From Memory by Allen Say

34. Polar Bear, Arctic Hare by Eileen Spinelli

35. Mallards by Margaret Hall

36. Native American Rock Art by Yvette La Pierre

37. Regarding The Bees by Kate Klise

38. Fair Weather by Richard Peck

39. Temperature by Kristin Schuetz

40. The Netherlands by Martin Hintz

41. Having Fun With Hair Feathering by Dana Meachen Rau

42. Scott of the Antarctic by Evelyn Dowdeswell, Julian Dowdeswell, and Angela Seddon

43. Mother’s Day Crafts by Arlene and Herbert Erlbach

44. Oregon by Deborah Kent

45. Louisiana by Allison Lassieur

Learn About Christmas

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Tweet Hello, everyone! You might want to know more about Christmas. Thank you for visiting my blog! Christmas is my favorite holiday. In Argentina, the weather is almost always warm at Christmas. Preparations for Christmas begin very early in December … Continue reading

Books I Recommend: The View From Saturday by E.L. Konigsburg

Hey, everyone! This is my 30th book recommendation. I hope you enjoy!

1. The View of Saturday by E.L. Konigsburg
2. Grace Makes It Great by Mary Casanova
3. Benny Uncovers A Mystery by Gertrude Chandler Warner
4. Wishing the Moon by Michael O. Tunnell
5. Grace by Mary Casanova
6. My Secret Guide to Paris by Lisa Schroeder
7. The Perfect Place by Teresa E. Harris
8. Danger in the Darkest Hour by Mary Pope Osborne
9. A Pinch of Magic by Kiki Thorpe
10. Remembering Mrs. Rossi by Amy Hest
11. Searching for Candlestick Park by Peg Kehret
12. The Mystery of the Star Ruby by Gertrude Chandler Warner
13. The Vampire Mystery by Gertrude Chandler Warner
14. Hound Dog True by Linda Urban
15. The Leap by Jonathan Stroud
16. I’m Too Fond of My Fur! by Geronimo Stilton
17. Vincent Van Gogh by Jan Greenberg and Sandra Jordan
18. Ripley’s Believe or Not! Kids & Silly Stories by Ripley Company Inc.
19. Vincent Van Gogh by Sean Connolly
20. Who Was Queen Victoria? by Jim Gigliotti
21. Vincent Van Gogh by Mike Venezia
22. Van Gogh by Shelley Swanson Sateron
23. Moon Plane by Peter McCarty
24. Walking to School by Eve Bunting
25. The Khan’s Daughter by Laurence Yep
26. The World Almanac for Kids 2011 by Infobase Publishing
27. Jacket by Andrew Clements
28. Hit & Miss by Paul Mantell
29. Johnny Appleseed by Will Moss
30.  If Stones Could Talk by Marc Aronson
31. Marking A Millennium by Betsy Maestro

Books I Recommend: Thanking the Moon by Grace Lin

Hey there, everyone! This is my 28th book recommendation. Thanks so much for participating!

1. Thanking the Moonby Grace Lin
2. Catching The Moonby Myla Goldberg
3. Abuelita’s Heartby Amy Córdova
4. Brown Girl Dreamby Jacqueline Woodson
5. The World Almanac for Kids 2013by Infobase Learning
6. How to Read the Solar Systemby Chris North and Paul G. Abel
7.Fairy Heaven and the Quest for the Wandby Gail Carson Levine
8. Phenomenaby Donna M. Jackson
9. The Princesses Collectionby Ann Braybrooks
10. Making Amazing Artby Sandi Henry
11. Lili on Stageby Rachel Isadora
12. Follow the Drinking Gourdby Cari Meister
13. The Red Threadby Grace Lin
14. Rules of Summerby Shaun Tan
15. Soccer on Sundayby Mary Pope Osborne
16. The Year of the Babyby Andrea Cheng
17. The Ghost Ship Mysteryby Gertrude Chandler Warner
18. Red Thread Sistersby Carol Antoinette Peacock
19. Three Adventures of the Boxcar Childrenby Gertrude Chandler Warner
20. Schoolhouse Mysteryby Gertrude Chandler Warner
21. The Movie Star Mysteryby Gertrude Chandler Warner
22. The Eagleby Cynthia Rylant
23. The Year of the Fortune Cookieby Andrea Cheng
24. The Mystery of the Grinning Gargoyleby Gertrude Chandler Warner
25. Caitlin the Ice Bearby Daisy Meadows
26. The Wide Awake Princessby E.D. Baker
27. Secret at the Chocolate Mansionby Leslie Margolis
28. The Enchanted Guideby Julie Ferris
29. The 10 Best Anxiety Bustersby Dr. Margaret Wehrenburg
30. The Swiss Family Robinsonby Johann Wyss
31. Serafina’s Promiseby Ann E. Burg

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The History of Cupcakes

Hi there! I decided to research about cupcakes because I was reading a fictional cupcake book. Hope you enjoy the cupcake facts!

The cupcake evolved in the United States in the 19th century, and it was revolutionary because of the amount of time it saved in the kitchen. There was a shift from weighing out ingredients when baking to measuring out ingredients. According to the Food Timeline Web, food historians have yet to pinpoint exactly where the name of the cupcake originated.

There are two theories: one, the cakes were originally cooked in cups and two, the ingredients used to make the cupcakes were measured out by the cup. In the beginning, cupcakes were sometimes called “number” cakes, because they were easy to remember by the measurements of ingredients it took to create them: One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, three cups of flour, four eggs, one cup of milk, and one spoonful of soda. Clearly, cupcakes today have expanded to a wide variety of ingredients, measurements, shapes, and decorations – but this was one of the first recipes for making what we know today as cupcakes.

Cupcakes were convenient because they cooked much quicker than larger cakes. When baking was down in hearth ovens, it would take a long time to bake a cake, and the final product would often be burned. Muffin tins, also called gem pans, were popular around the turn of the 20th century, so people started created cupcakes in tins.

Since their creation, cupcakes have become a pop culture trend in the culinary world. They have spawned dozens of bakeries devoted entirely to them. While chocolate and vanilla remain classic favorites, fancy flavors such as raspberry meringue and espresso fudge can be found on menus.

There are cookbooks, blogs, and magazines specifically dedicated to cupcakes. Icing, also called frosting in the United States, is a sweet often creamy glaze made of sugar with a liquid, such as water or milk, that is often enriched with ingredients such as butter, egg whites, cream cheese, or flavorings. It is used to cover or decorate baked goods.

Elizabeth Raffald documented the first recipe for icing in 1769 in the Experienced English Housekeeper, according to the Food Timeline. The simplest icing is a glace icing, containing powdered sugar and water. This can be flavored and colored as desired, for example, by using lemon juice in place of the water.

More complicated icings can be made by beating fat into powdered sugar (as in buttercream), by melting fat and sugar together, by using egg whites (as in royal icing), and by adding other ingredients such as glycerin (as in fondant). Some icings can be made from combinations of sugar and cream cheese or sour cream, or by using ground almonds (as in marzipan). The first mention of the cupcake can be traced as far back as 1796, when a recipe notation of “a cake to be baked in small cups” was written in American Cookery by Amelia Simmons.

The earliest documentation of the term cupcake was in ‘Seventy-five Receipts for Pastry, Cakes, and Sweetmeats’ in 1828 in Eliza Leslie’s Receipts cookbook. In the early 19th century, there were two different uses for the name cup cake or cupcake. In previous centuries, before muffin tins were widely available, the cakes were often baked in individual pottery cups, ramekins, or molds and took their name from the cups they were baked in.

This is the use of the name that has remained, and the name of “cupcake” is now given to any small cake that is about the size of a teacup. The name “fairy cake” is a fanciful description of its size, which would be appropriate for a party of diminutive fairies to share. While English fairy cakes vary in size more than American cupcakes, they are traditionally smaller and are rarely topped with elaborate icing.

The other kind of “cup cake” referred to a cake whose ingredients were measured by volume, using a standard-sized cup, instead of being weighed. Recipes whose ingredients were measured using a standard-sized cup could also be baked in cups; however, they were more commonly baked in tins as layers or loaves. In later years, when the use of volume measurements was firmly established in home kitchens, these recipes became known as 1234 cakes or quarter cakes, so called because they are made up of four ingredients: one cup of butter, two cups of sugar, three cups of flour, and four eggs.

They are plain yellow cakes, somewhat less rich and less expensive than pound cake, due to using about half as much butter and eggs compared to pound cake. The names of these two major classes of cakes were intended to signal the method to the baker; “cup cake” uses a volume measurement, and “pound cake” uses a weight measurement. Cupcakes have become more than a trend over the years, they’ve become an industry!

Paper baking cups first hit U.S. markets after the end of the World War II. An artillery manufacturer called the James River Corporation began manufacturing cupcake liners for U.S. markets when its military markets began to diminish. By 1969, they consolidated business as a paper company and left artillery manufacturing behind.

During the 1950s, the paper baking cup gained popularity as U.S. housewives purchased them for convenience. Their flexibility grew when bakers realized that they could bake muffins as well as cupcakes in the baking cups. The modern idea of the cupcake is probably different from the historical origin of the phrase.

Imagine what it would be like being a cook in 19th-century Britain or North America. When food historians approach the topic of cupcakes, they run into a gray area in which the practice of making individual cup-sized cakes can become confused with the convention of making cakes with cup-measured ingredients. The notion of baking small cakes in individual containers probably began with the use of clay or earthenware mugs.

It could have been a way to use up extra batter; to make the most efficient use of a hot oven by placing small ramekins, or little baking dishes, in unused spaces; or to create an evenly baked product fast when fuel was in short supply. Early in the 20th century, the advent of multi-cupcake molded tins brought modest mass production methods to cupcake making, and a modern baking tradition was born. Cakes in some form have been around since ancient times, and today’s familiar round cakes with frosting can be traced back to the 17th century, made possible by advances in food technology such as: better ovens, metal cake molds and pans, and the refinement of sugar.

I got it at storify.com but I originally got it at Google Images.

image

Websites I used:

http://iml.jou.ufl.edu/projects/spring07/ayers/history.html

http://people.rit.edu/kge3737/320/project3/history.html

http://recipes.howstuffworks.com/food-facts/who-invented-the-cupcake.htm

http://inventors.about.com/od/cstartinventions/a/Who-Invented-The-Cupcake.htm

Where Would You Fly

Hi there, everyone! You are about to enter a writing & inspiring world. So hang on to your memories on Earth! Look below and you’ll see the writing prompt and story.

If you were a bird and you could fly anywhere, where would you go? (Look below for my answer). If I were a bird and I could fly anywhere, I would go to a tropical island that I could have all that’s needed. Look below for my story.

A Bird Flies Over An Island

I lived happily with my owner until one day, I was looking for my owner when I saw something below. I flew down to investigate and explore. I had found out this was the island of the Colorful Fairies. When I saw the Fairies, I asked them where my owner was and found out that my owner had went to heaven.

The Fairies said my real family was here. So I set out to find them. I asked around and I was about give up when a fruit fairy asked is that my family. I told her, “Yes,”!

My family asked me what happened to my owner. So I told them, he went to heaven. They felt sorry for me. They said that I was welcome to stay with them as long as I didn’t grab food before the rest of my family did.

I stayed as long as I could. I knew that I had to return to Hawaii. I had to be in a pet store again but this time, nobody came. So I mated and had 6 baby birds but I never forgot my family.

5 years later, I decided to visit the island with my new part of family. They loved to see their grand-birds and my mate. I promised I’d come back every 2 years until they went up to heaven and all went well.

The End

This photo below I got from http://www.tringa.org/images/8861_House_Finch_05-09-2008_0.jpg.

image

Life as An Autumn Gold Apple

Hi there! This may help you learn more about the apple. You are about to enter a life of an apple that you might know about.

I was born as a seed in November 19, 1900. Until spring arrived, I slept. When I woke up, I was a tree.

I grew apples and people came and picked the apples off of me. So the people made new seeds. After my apples were gone, everyone sat under me.

I felt loved until autumn. The leaves started falling off me for the kids to play with. Finally, winter came and I fell asleep.

When I woke up again, I had apple blossoms on me. Then, I grew more apples. Meanwhile, the seeds from my apples were young trees and they did the same thing.

As I got older, more people were able to play on me. One day, I got so old no one was able to play with me. That night, a strong thunderstorm tore one of my branches.

So they had to cut me down. They had a funeral for me. I was 49 years old. From then on, the people used my stump as something useful.

The other trees lived to be 100 years old. To this day, my apples are all over the world. So whenever you eat an autumn gold apple, just remember this story.

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I got this photo at Google Images but the main place it came from was http://m.recipetips.com/glossary-term/t–38648/crimson-gold-apple.asp.

Nature: Research for Carnations

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Hi there! Camilla has let me pick my own assignment. I chose a flower. I would have done more flowers but Camilla said to choose only one flower. So I chose carnation.

The single flowers of the Carnations species, Dianthus caryophyllus (that’s the scientific name) has 5 petals and they can vary from white to pink to purple in colors. Border Carnation cultivars may have double flowers with 1 to 40 petals. When they grow in gardens, Carnations grow to between 6 and 8.5 cm in diameter. Petals on Carnations are generally clawed or serrated.

Carnations are bisexual flowers and bloom simply or in a branched or forked cluster. The stamens on Carnations can occur in one or two whorls, in equal number or twice the number of the petals. The Carnation leaves are narrow and stalk less and their color varies from green to grey-blue or purple. Carnations grow big, full blooms on strong, straight stems. The carnation’s history dates back to ancient Greek and Roman times, when it was used in art and decor.

Christians or some spirituals believe that the first carnation bloomed on earth when Mary wept for Jesus as he carried his cross. Carnations in these early times were predominantly found in shades of pale pink and peach, but over the years the palette of available colors has grown to include red, yellow, white, purple, and even green. Throughout so many centuries of change, the popularity of the carnation has remained undiminished. The fact that the carnation continues to endure is a testament to its vast appeal.

The meanings of carnations include fascination, distinction, and love. Like many other flowers, different messages can also be expressed with the flower’s different color varieties. Light red carnations, for example, are often used to convey admiration, whereas the dark red version expresses deeper sentiments of love and affection. White carnations are associated with purity and luck, and pink carnations are often given as a sign of gratitude.

In the early part of the 20th century, carnations became the official flower of Mother’s Day in addition finding particular significance in many other cultures worldwide. To this day, carnations remain a favorite flower choice for many different occasions. They are immediately recognizable flowers, and they possess a charm and allure that continues to captivate people around the globe. In fact, in many parts of the world, the popularity of carnations surpasses that of any other flower including roses.

The powerful sentiments these flowers can express are a perfect complement to their classic beauty and long-lasting freshness. Carnation is a flowering plant that belongs to the family Caryophyllaceae. There are over 300 varieties of carnations that can be found throughout the world. These plants originate from Europe and Asia.

Carnations are cultivated at least 2000 years because of their beautiful flowers and intense fragrance. Carnations require well drained soil, enough moisture and direct sunlight for successful growth. These flowers are symbol of labor movement and mother’s love in the most countries of the world. Some people in France believe that carnations symbolize bad luck, where they are used mostly for the preparation of funeral bouquets. Carnation is a herbaceous plant that can reach 31 inches in height.

Carnation has 6 inches long slender leaves. They are usually grayish or bluish green in color and covered with waxy substance. White carnations will change its color after adding food coloring to the water. The flower will change its color after 24 hours.

Dianthus is Latin which for “flower of the gods”. White carnations are inevitable part of wedding bouquets and bouquets prepared for the first wedding anniversary. Carnations are birth flowers for all people that are born in January. These flowers are often used as decoration for tuxedoes.

Bouquets made of pink carnations are traditionally prepared for Mother’s day. Colombia is the greatest producer of carnations in the world. Carnations are national flowers of countries such as Monaco, Spain, Slovenia and Ohio. They are also used as a symbol of different fraternities and sororities.

Carnations can propagate via seeds and plant cuttings. Carnations are perennial plants, which mean that they can live more than 2 years. Carnations also have long lifespan in the vase – they can remain fresh up to 14 days after removal from the ground.

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This is the website I got the image from even though I found it on Google Images: http://www.list-of-birthstones.com/birth%20flowers/Pictures%20of%20birth%20flowers/carnation%20flower.jpg

Sources I Used:

http://www.theflowerexpert.com/content/mostpopularflowers/carnations

http://www.proflowers.com/blog/history-and-meaning-of-carnations

http://www.softschools.com/facts/plants/carnation_facts/637/

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Books I Recommend: The Final Battle…For Now by Lauren Baratz-Logsted

Hi there! This is the 18th book recommendation!

1. The Final Battle…for Nowby Lauren Baratz-Logsted
2. Hailey Twitch and the Great Teacher Switchby Lauren Barnholdt
3. Lost and Foundby Andrew Clements
4. Hailey Twitch and the Campground Itchby Lauren Barnholdt
5. Ibby’s Magic Weekendby Heather Dyer
6. Mary Mae and the Gospel Truthby Sandra Dutton
7. The Littles and the Big Stormby John Peterson
8. Aloha, Kanani!by Lisa Yee
9. Felicity’s Short Story Collectionby Valerie Tripp
10. Molly Marches onby Valerie Tripp
11. Kaya’s Short Story Collectionby Janet Shaw
12. Caddy’s Worldby Hilary McKay
13. The Quigleys Not for Saleby Simon Mason
14. The Quigleys in a Spinby Simon Mason
15. Saffy’s Angelby Hilary McKay
16. Sixth-Grade Glommers, Norks, and Meby Liza Papademetriou
17. Sheila Rae, the Braveby Kevin Henkes
18. Hair in Funny Placesby Bobette Cole
19. The Harmonicaby Tony Johnston
20. The Barn Owlsby Tony Johnston
21. Buffalo Girlsby Bobette McCarthy
22. The Little Piano Girlby Ann Ingalls & Maryann Macdonald

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A Realistic World Beyond Your Eyes

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Illustration by Lillian Darnell – 2015

Hi there, everyone! Please note that the words are in English. You’re about to enter a realistic world that will pull you inside the realistic world which is called Cinnamon Extraordinary Planet.

“Mother, where are my cinnamon scented dresses?” asked a 10 cinnamon cakes old girl (which is 15 years old in earth years). “Campari, sorry but I just put them in a wet donut roll (a washer) and won’t be done until its dry.” answered Mother as she applied lipstick on her lips.

“Oh fine, do I have to wear cinnamon shirts?” asked Campari as she pouted around the cinnamon room.

“Oh, hi there! I didn’t see you come in! My name is Campari. My mother mentioned it earlier. My mother’s name is Sweet Cinnamon Dazzle although she likes going by SCD or Mother. I have a father who works at a cinnamon factory and I hardly see him but I do know his name which is Twisty Spice Herb and he also likes to go by TSH or Father. My best friend is Splendid Apple Cinnamon. She likes going by her full name.” explained Campari Dazzle as she looked at her mother with a cinnamon? look.
“So you must be a world visitor. Campari told me about you. Nice to meet you!” said Mother as she looked at the reader.

“Campari has a cinnamon dance to go to tonight and is very excited to be going there.” said Mother in a jokingly way.

So Campari got ready for the dance and she saw Sherbet waiting for her so she said,”Goodbye, Mother!” so fast that her mother didn’t get to tell her,”Have fun!” and so the dancing partners headed to the dance.

When they got there, they danced until midnight to get some cinnamon rolls. After that, they danced some more. They danced out onto the cinnamon scented balcony in the moonlight and kissed briefly. Shortly after that, they went inside and left the dance.

“Mother, I had the most wonderful time at the dance.” said Campari dreamily. “Well, that’s great!” said Mother. Then they both went to sleep.

The next morning, Campari said,”I’m in love,” and her mother said,”Who are you in love with?” and she responded,”Sherbet.”Do you want to get married yet?” said Mother.

“Mother, I want to have dates with him first”. So the couple set out on several dates a few days later. Just a month after, Sherbert asked,”Will you marry me, my cinnamon bun?” and of course she couldn’t say no so she said,”Yes, I’ll marry you!” and then they went out to find Campari’s mother.

“Oh, Campari! You must be Sherbert! You came to tell me you want a wedding”. So shortly after, the wedding begins and all Sherbert and Campari’s families and friends came. And they lived happily ever after.

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