How The Sun Came To Be

Hey, everyone! You’re about to enter an interview with Lady Weather. Here are some other weather-related blog posts: http://lilliandarnell.com/2018/02/02/how-rain-came-to-be-natures-glitter/ and http://lilliandarnell.com/2015/06/05/latest-weather-thunderstorms/. I hope you enjoy!

Lady Wendy Weather: Welcome to Sunny Fields! Are you ready to get started, Mrs. Alice?

Alice: Thank you! Please just call me Alice, Lady Wendy Weather. Yes, I’m so thrilled to get started!

Lady Wendy Weather: Ok then. By the way, please just call me Wendy. Here’s the first question: How did the sun evolve?

Alice: Scientists believe that the sun and the foundation of the solar system were made from an enormous, changing cloud of gas and particles known as the solar nebula. As the nebula gave away because of the force the nebula had, the nebula rotated faster and grew into a disk. A lot of the matter was dragged to the center to create the sun we see today.

Lady Wendy Weather: Wow, that’s very important. How are the sun and its atmosphere divided?

Alice: The sun and its environment are divided into individual zones and bands. The solar center, from the interior out, is formed up of the heart, radiative zone, and the convective zone. The solar air over that consists of the photosphere, chromosphere, a development region and the corona. Behind that is the solar wind, an outpouring of gas from the corona.

Lady Wendy Weather: That’s very informational! How strong is the magnetic field? What is a flare?

Alice: The power of the sun’s magnetic field is usually only about twice as powerful as Earth’s field. Nonetheless, the sun becomes extremely concentrated in small areas, leading up to three thousand times powerful than normal. These difficulties and twists in the magnetic field happen because the sun revolves more swiftly at the tropics than at the larger latitudes and because the internal parts of the sun revolve faster than the exterior. These distortions form features varying from sunspots to thrilling explosions known as flares and coronal mass ejections. Flares are the most powerful eruptions in the solar system, while coronal mass ejections are less powerful but require remarkable amounts of matter which can make a particular ejection spout approximately 20 billion tons (18 billion metric tons) of matter into space.

Lady Wendy Weather: That’s very impressive! Next question: What is the sun made of?

Alice: That is a hard question but luckily I have the answer for you. Here is the answer: Just like utmost additional stars, the sun is formed essentially of hydrogen, accompanied with helium. Nearly all the leftover matter consists of 7 other parts which are oxygen, carbon, neon, nitrogen, magnesium, iron, and silicon. For every 1, 000, 000 molecules of hydrogen in the sun, there are ninety-eight thousand of helium in the sun, eight-hundred fifty of oxygen in the sun, three-hundred sixty of carbon in the sun, a hundred twenty of neon in the sun, a hundred ten of nitrogen in the sun, forty of magnesium in the sun, thirty five of iron in the sun,  and thirty five of silicon. Still, hydrogen is considered the lightest of all elements, so it only values for about seventy-two percent of the sun’s core, while helium forms about twenty-six percent of the sun’s core.

Lady Wendy Weather: How fascinating! What are sunspots? Do solar cycles have anything to do with sunspots?

Alice: Sunspots are comparatively cool, hidden features on the sun’s exterior that are usually approximately circular. Sunspots surface where thick bunches of magnetic field lines from the sun’s inside cut through the surface. Yes, solar cycles have a lot to do with sunspots. The amount of sunspots modifies as solar magnetic activity does and the difference in this number, from a minimum of none to a maximum of about two-hundred-fifty sunspots or bunches of sunspots and then back to a minimum, is identified as the solar cycle, and norms about eleven cycles long. At the end of a cycle, the magnetic field quickly changes its polarity.

Lady Wendy Weather: Wow, very impressive! Are you ready to wrap today’s interview up?

Alice; Most definitely. See you again soon, everyone!

Lady Wendy Weather: Bye, Alice. That’s a wrap for Sunny Fields’ interview. See you next time!

Website Source I Used:

https://www.space.com/58-the-sun-formation-facts-and-characteristics.html

Nature: Research for Carnations

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Hi there! Camilla has let me pick my own assignment. I chose a flower. I would have done more flowers but Camilla said to choose only one flower. So I chose carnation.

The single flowers of the Carnations species, Dianthus caryophyllus (that’s the scientific name) has 5 petals and they can vary from white to pink to purple in colors. Border Carnation cultivars may have double flowers with 1 to 40 petals. When they grow in gardens, Carnations grow to between 6 and 8.5 cm in diameter. Petals on Carnations are generally clawed or serrated.

Carnations are bisexual flowers and bloom simply or in a branched or forked cluster. The stamens on Carnations can occur in one or two whorls, in equal number or twice the number of the petals. The Carnation leaves are narrow and stalk less and their color varies from green to grey-blue or purple. Carnations grow big, full blooms on strong, straight stems. The carnation’s history dates back to ancient Greek and Roman times, when it was used in art and decor.

Christians or some spirituals believe that the first carnation bloomed on earth when Mary wept for Jesus as he carried his cross. Carnations in these early times were predominantly found in shades of pale pink and peach, but over the years the palette of available colors has grown to include red, yellow, white, purple, and even green. Throughout so many centuries of change, the popularity of the carnation has remained undiminished. The fact that the carnation continues to endure is a testament to its vast appeal.

The meanings of carnations include fascination, distinction, and love. Like many other flowers, different messages can also be expressed with the flower’s different color varieties. Light red carnations, for example, are often used to convey admiration, whereas the dark red version expresses deeper sentiments of love and affection. White carnations are associated with purity and luck, and pink carnations are often given as a sign of gratitude.

In the early part of the 20th century, carnations became the official flower of Mother’s Day in addition finding particular significance in many other cultures worldwide. To this day, carnations remain a favorite flower choice for many different occasions. They are immediately recognizable flowers, and they possess a charm and allure that continues to captivate people around the globe. In fact, in many parts of the world, the popularity of carnations surpasses that of any other flower including roses.

The powerful sentiments these flowers can express are a perfect complement to their classic beauty and long-lasting freshness. Carnation is a flowering plant that belongs to the family Caryophyllaceae. There are over 300 varieties of carnations that can be found throughout the world. These plants originate from Europe and Asia.

Carnations are cultivated at least 2000 years because of their beautiful flowers and intense fragrance. Carnations require well drained soil, enough moisture and direct sunlight for successful growth. These flowers are symbol of labor movement and mother’s love in the most countries of the world. Some people in France believe that carnations symbolize bad luck, where they are used mostly for the preparation of funeral bouquets. Carnation is a herbaceous plant that can reach 31 inches in height.

Carnation has 6 inches long slender leaves. They are usually grayish or bluish green in color and covered with waxy substance. White carnations will change its color after adding food coloring to the water. The flower will change its color after 24 hours.

Dianthus is Latin which for “flower of the gods”. White carnations are inevitable part of wedding bouquets and bouquets prepared for the first wedding anniversary. Carnations are birth flowers for all people that are born in January. These flowers are often used as decoration for tuxedoes.

Bouquets made of pink carnations are traditionally prepared for Mother’s day. Colombia is the greatest producer of carnations in the world. Carnations are national flowers of countries such as Monaco, Spain, Slovenia and Ohio. They are also used as a symbol of different fraternities and sororities.

Carnations can propagate via seeds and plant cuttings. Carnations are perennial plants, which mean that they can live more than 2 years. Carnations also have long lifespan in the vase – they can remain fresh up to 14 days after removal from the ground.

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This is the website I got the image from even though I found it on Google Images: http://www.list-of-birthstones.com/birth%20flowers/Pictures%20of%20birth%20flowers/carnation%20flower.jpg

Sources I Used:

http://www.theflowerexpert.com/content/mostpopularflowers/carnations

http://www.proflowers.com/blog/history-and-meaning-of-carnations

http://www.softschools.com/facts/plants/carnation_facts/637/

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