Learn About Christmas

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Tweet Hello, everyone! You might want to know more about Christmas. Thank you for visiting my blog! Christmas is my favorite holiday. In Argentina, the weather is almost always warm at Christmas. Preparations for Christmas begin very early in December … Continue reading

Life as An Autumn Gold Apple

Hi there! This may help you learn more about the apple. You are about to enter a life of an apple that you might know about.

I was born as a seed in November 19, 1900. Until spring arrived, I slept. When I woke up, I was a tree.

I grew apples and people came and picked the apples off of me. So the people made new seeds. After my apples were gone, everyone sat under me.

I felt loved until autumn. The leaves started falling off me for the kids to play with. Finally, winter came and I fell asleep.

When I woke up again, I had apple blossoms on me. Then, I grew more apples. Meanwhile, the seeds from my apples were young trees and they did the same thing.

As I got older, more people were able to play on me. One day, I got so old no one was able to play with me. That night, a strong thunderstorm tore one of my branches.

So they had to cut me down. They had a funeral for me. I was 49 years old. From then on, the people used my stump as something useful.

The other trees lived to be 100 years old. To this day, my apples are all over the world. So whenever you eat an autumn gold apple, just remember this story.

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I got this photo at Google Images but the main place it came from was http://m.recipetips.com/glossary-term/t–38648/crimson-gold-apple.asp.

Nature: Research for Carnations

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Hi there! Camilla has let me pick my own assignment. I chose a flower. I would have done more flowers but Camilla said to choose only one flower. So I chose carnation.

The single flowers of the Carnations species, Dianthus caryophyllus (that’s the scientific name) has 5 petals and they can vary from white to pink to purple in colors. Border Carnation cultivars may have double flowers with 1 to 40 petals. When they grow in gardens, Carnations grow to between 6 and 8.5 cm in diameter. Petals on Carnations are generally clawed or serrated.

Carnations are bisexual flowers and bloom simply or in a branched or forked cluster. The stamens on Carnations can occur in one or two whorls, in equal number or twice the number of the petals. The Carnation leaves are narrow and stalk less and their color varies from green to grey-blue or purple. Carnations grow big, full blooms on strong, straight stems. The carnation’s history dates back to ancient Greek and Roman times, when it was used in art and decor.

Christians or some spirituals believe that the first carnation bloomed on earth when Mary wept for Jesus as he carried his cross. Carnations in these early times were predominantly found in shades of pale pink and peach, but over the years the palette of available colors has grown to include red, yellow, white, purple, and even green. Throughout so many centuries of change, the popularity of the carnation has remained undiminished. The fact that the carnation continues to endure is a testament to its vast appeal.

The meanings of carnations include fascination, distinction, and love. Like many other flowers, different messages can also be expressed with the flower’s different color varieties. Light red carnations, for example, are often used to convey admiration, whereas the dark red version expresses deeper sentiments of love and affection. White carnations are associated with purity and luck, and pink carnations are often given as a sign of gratitude.

In the early part of the 20th century, carnations became the official flower of Mother’s Day in addition finding particular significance in many other cultures worldwide. To this day, carnations remain a favorite flower choice for many different occasions. They are immediately recognizable flowers, and they possess a charm and allure that continues to captivate people around the globe. In fact, in many parts of the world, the popularity of carnations surpasses that of any other flower including roses.

The powerful sentiments these flowers can express are a perfect complement to their classic beauty and long-lasting freshness. Carnation is a flowering plant that belongs to the family Caryophyllaceae. There are over 300 varieties of carnations that can be found throughout the world. These plants originate from Europe and Asia.

Carnations are cultivated at least 2000 years because of their beautiful flowers and intense fragrance. Carnations require well drained soil, enough moisture and direct sunlight for successful growth. These flowers are symbol of labor movement and mother’s love in the most countries of the world. Some people in France believe that carnations symbolize bad luck, where they are used mostly for the preparation of funeral bouquets. Carnation is a herbaceous plant that can reach 31 inches in height.

Carnation has 6 inches long slender leaves. They are usually grayish or bluish green in color and covered with waxy substance. White carnations will change its color after adding food coloring to the water. The flower will change its color after 24 hours.

Dianthus is Latin which for “flower of the gods”. White carnations are inevitable part of wedding bouquets and bouquets prepared for the first wedding anniversary. Carnations are birth flowers for all people that are born in January. These flowers are often used as decoration for tuxedoes.

Bouquets made of pink carnations are traditionally prepared for Mother’s day. Colombia is the greatest producer of carnations in the world. Carnations are national flowers of countries such as Monaco, Spain, Slovenia and Ohio. They are also used as a symbol of different fraternities and sororities.

Carnations can propagate via seeds and plant cuttings. Carnations are perennial plants, which mean that they can live more than 2 years. Carnations also have long lifespan in the vase – they can remain fresh up to 14 days after removal from the ground.

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This is the website I got the image from even though I found it on Google Images: http://www.list-of-birthstones.com/birth%20flowers/Pictures%20of%20birth%20flowers/carnation%20flower.jpg

Sources I Used:

http://www.theflowerexpert.com/content/mostpopularflowers/carnations

http://www.proflowers.com/blog/history-and-meaning-of-carnations

http://www.softschools.com/facts/plants/carnation_facts/637/

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Nature LOG – December 12, 2011

I  see stark trees right in the middle of  the grass.

I see pretty rocks on the bricks in our backyard .

I see an airplane roar loudly up in the gray sky.

I saw a bird sing on the solid fence.

I saw a dog growl next door and was near half of the solid fence.

I see jabbed weeds in our grass.

I see pointy leaves.

I see extinct grass.

Learning about Leaves

I had fun going out collecting leaves yesterday and I enjoyed taking a picture of all  the leaves. The wind was blowing so hard that I had to go inside to get my warm scarf and then I went back out until it was time to get Thomas. When we got home I went to some leaf tumble stories,  a leaf  jigsaw puzzle and a BrainPop leaf video on the internet.