Books I Recommend: A Minty Mess by Helen Perelman

Hey, everyone! This is my 56th book recommendation. I hope you enjoy! Also, in case your wondering the blue link are amazon affiliates. (It means we earn a few cents from what you paid for the book).

1. A Minty Mess by Helen Perelman

2. Jelly Bean Jumble by Helen Perelman

3. The Coconut Clue by Helen Perelman

4. Taffy Trouble by Helen Perelman

5. Sweet Secrets by Helen Perelman

6. Werewolves Don’t Run for President by Debbie Dadey and Marcia Thornton Jones

7. The Rainbow Opal by Paula Harrison

8. The Ice Diamond by Paula Harrison

9. Horrible Harry and the Battle of the Bugs by Suzy Kline

10. Taking Wing by Nancy Price Graff

11. Marie-Grace and the Orphans by Sarah Masters Buckley

12. Meet Marie-Grace by Sarah Masters Buckley

13. A Shiloh Christmas by Phillips Reynolds Naylor

14. The Tiger, the Brahman, and The Jackal by M. J. York

15. Paint It by Mari Bolte

16. The Sea Tiger by Victoria Turnbull

17. A Very Personal Computer by Justine Rendal

18. Tales From Watership Down by Richard Adams

19. Before You Were Born by Howard Schwartz

20. Three Magic Balloons by Paul Margulies

21. The Trouble with Henry by Deborah O’Neal

22. Little America by Richard Evelyn Byrd

23. The Chocolate Dreams by Helen Perelman

24. Presenting Buffalo Bill by Candace Fleming

25. The Mystery of the Singing Ghost by Gertrude Chandler Warner

26. What I Really Want to do is Direct by Trudi Trueit

27. Journey to the Blue Moon by Rebecca Rupp

28. The Magic Paintbrush by Laurence Yep

29. The Dogs Of Winter by Bobbie Pyron

30. A Whale of a Tale by Debbie Dadey

31. The Genie in the Book by Cindy Trumbore

32. Alone by Admiral Richard E. Byrd

33.  Because of Thursday by Patricia Polacco

34. The Bear Report by Thyra Heder

35. The Great Doughnut Parade by Rebecca Bond

36. Colorado by Barbara A. Somervill

37. Illinois by Michael Burgan

38. Indiana by Darlene R. Stille

39. Iowa by Jean F. Blashfield

40. Nebraska by Ann Heinrichs

41. The Luminous Pearl by Betty L. Torre

42. Little Hands Celebrate America! by Jill Frankel Hauser

43. Polar Bear, Arctic Hare by Eileen Spinelli

44. Art by Heather Alexander

45. You’re Here For A Reason by Nancy Tillman

46. The Treehouse by Marije Tolman and Ronald Tolman

47. The Encyclopedia of Crystals, Herbs, and New Age Elements by Adams Media

48. All Hail The Queen by Erica David

49. Treasure by Tennant Redbank

50. The Book by Keith Houston

51. Four Mice Deep In The Jungle by Geronimo Stilton

52. The Karate Mouse by Geronimo Stilton

53. Neversink by Barry Wolverton

54. Unhooking the Moon by Gregory Hughes

55. Philippa Fisher and the Dream-Maker’s Daughter by Liz Kessler

56. Trixie the Halloween Fairy by Daisy Meadows

57. Annabelle the Drawing Fairy by Daisy Meadows

58. The People and Culture of the Blackfeet by Kris Rickard and Raymond Bial

Books I Recommend: The Third Journey Through Time by Geronimo Stilton

Hey, everyone! This is my 41st book recommendation. I hope you enjoy!

1. The Race Against Time by Geronimo Stilton

2. Thea and the Chocolate Sabotage by Geronimo Stilton

3. The Icing on the Cupcake by Coco Simon

4. Aisha the Princess and The Pea Fairy by Daisy Meadows

5. Eleanor the Snow White Fairy by Daisy Meadows

6. Faith the Cinderella Fairy by Daisy Meadows

7. What Goes Up Must Come Down by Anne Mazer

8. The Stolen Sapphire by Sarah Masters Buckley

9. The Blossoming Universe Of Violet Diamond by Brenda Woods

10. The Heaven Fell by Carolyn Marsden

11. The Jade Dragon by Carolyn Marsden and Virginia Shin-Mui Loh

12. Thea and the Tropical Treasure by Geronimo Stilton

13. Encyclopedia Brown Takes The Cake by Donald J. Sobol and Glenn Andrews

14. The Case of the Disappearing Dinosaur by James Preller

15. Just Behave, Pablo Picasso! by Jonah Winter

16. Anklet for a Princess by Lila Mehta

17. Just Because by Rebecca Elliott

18. Mountain Wedding by Faye Gibbons

19. If I Never Forever Endeavor by Holly Meade

20. Cèzanne and the Apple Boy by Laurence Anholt

21. Homeless Bird by Gloria Whelan

22. Shirley Temple by John Bankston

23. Wilma Rudolph by Victoria Sherrow

24. Horrible Harry and the Goog by Suzy Kline

25. The Make-a-Pet Mystery by Carolyn Keene

26. Jazz by Walter Dean Myers

27. Seeing Red by Katherine Erskine

28. The Mystery Of The Lost Village by Gertrude Chandler Warner

29. Dark Emperor and Other Poems by Joyce Sidman

30. Blossom the Flower Fairy by Daisy Meadows

31. ‘Tis the Season by Ann M. Martin

32. George’s Secret Key To The Universe by Lucy and Stephen Hawking

33. Who Was Claude Monet? by Ann Waldron

34. Who Was Albert Einstein? by Jess Brallier

35. Who Was Sally Ride? by Megan Stine

36. Who Was Ernest Shackleton? by James Buckley Jr.

37. Who Was Maurice Sendak? by Janet B. Pascal

38. Who Was Isaac Newton? by Janet B. Pascal

39. House of the Red Fish by Graham Salisbury

40. George’s Cosmic Treasure Hunt by Lucy and Stephen Hawking

41. Surprise Island by Gertrude Chandler Warner

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Tweet Hello, everyone! You might want to know more about Christmas. Thank you for visiting my blog! Christmas is my favorite holiday. In Argentina, the weather is almost always warm at Christmas. Preparations for Christmas begin very early in December … Continue reading

Books I Recommend: Thanking the Moon by Grace Lin

Hey there, everyone! This is my 28th book recommendation. Thanks so much for participating!

1. Thanking the Moonby Grace Lin
2. Catching The Moonby Myla Goldberg
3. Abuelita’s Heartby Amy Córdova
4. Brown Girl Dreamby Jacqueline Woodson
5. The World Almanac for Kids 2013by Infobase Learning
6. How to Read the Solar Systemby Chris North and Paul G. Abel
7.Fairy Heaven and the Quest for the Wandby Gail Carson Levine
8. Phenomenaby Donna M. Jackson
9. The Princesses Collectionby Ann Braybrooks
10. Making Amazing Artby Sandi Henry
11. Lili on Stageby Rachel Isadora
12. Follow the Drinking Gourdby Cari Meister
13. The Red Threadby Grace Lin
14. Rules of Summerby Shaun Tan
15. Soccer on Sundayby Mary Pope Osborne
16. The Year of the Babyby Andrea Cheng
17. The Ghost Ship Mysteryby Gertrude Chandler Warner
18. Red Thread Sistersby Carol Antoinette Peacock
19. Three Adventures of the Boxcar Childrenby Gertrude Chandler Warner
20. Schoolhouse Mysteryby Gertrude Chandler Warner
21. The Movie Star Mysteryby Gertrude Chandler Warner
22. The Eagleby Cynthia Rylant
23. The Year of the Fortune Cookieby Andrea Cheng
24. The Mystery of the Grinning Gargoyleby Gertrude Chandler Warner
25. Caitlin the Ice Bearby Daisy Meadows
26. The Wide Awake Princessby E.D. Baker
27. Secret at the Chocolate Mansionby Leslie Margolis
28. The Enchanted Guideby Julie Ferris
29. The 10 Best Anxiety Bustersby Dr. Margaret Wehrenburg
30. The Swiss Family Robinsonby Johann Wyss
31. Serafina’s Promiseby Ann E. Burg

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The History of Cupcakes

Hi there! I decided to research about cupcakes because I was reading a fictional cupcake book. Hope you enjoy the cupcake facts!

The cupcake evolved in the United States in the 19th century, and it was revolutionary because of the amount of time it saved in the kitchen. There was a shift from weighing out ingredients when baking to measuring out ingredients. According to the Food Timeline Web, food historians have yet to pinpoint exactly where the name of the cupcake originated.

There are two theories: one, the cakes were originally cooked in cups and two, the ingredients used to make the cupcakes were measured out by the cup. In the beginning, cupcakes were sometimes called “number” cakes, because they were easy to remember by the measurements of ingredients it took to create them: One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, three cups of flour, four eggs, one cup of milk, and one spoonful of soda. Clearly, cupcakes today have expanded to a wide variety of ingredients, measurements, shapes, and decorations – but this was one of the first recipes for making what we know today as cupcakes.

Cupcakes were convenient because they cooked much quicker than larger cakes. When baking was down in hearth ovens, it would take a long time to bake a cake, and the final product would often be burned. Muffin tins, also called gem pans, were popular around the turn of the 20th century, so people started created cupcakes in tins.

Since their creation, cupcakes have become a pop culture trend in the culinary world. They have spawned dozens of bakeries devoted entirely to them. While chocolate and vanilla remain classic favorites, fancy flavors such as raspberry meringue and espresso fudge can be found on menus.

There are cookbooks, blogs, and magazines specifically dedicated to cupcakes. Icing, also called frosting in the United States, is a sweet often creamy glaze made of sugar with a liquid, such as water or milk, that is often enriched with ingredients such as butter, egg whites, cream cheese, or flavorings. It is used to cover or decorate baked goods.

Elizabeth Raffald documented the first recipe for icing in 1769 in the Experienced English Housekeeper, according to the Food Timeline. The simplest icing is a glace icing, containing powdered sugar and water. This can be flavored and colored as desired, for example, by using lemon juice in place of the water.

More complicated icings can be made by beating fat into powdered sugar (as in buttercream), by melting fat and sugar together, by using egg whites (as in royal icing), and by adding other ingredients such as glycerin (as in fondant). Some icings can be made from combinations of sugar and cream cheese or sour cream, or by using ground almonds (as in marzipan). The first mention of the cupcake can be traced as far back as 1796, when a recipe notation of “a cake to be baked in small cups” was written in American Cookery by Amelia Simmons.

The earliest documentation of the term cupcake was in ‘Seventy-five Receipts for Pastry, Cakes, and Sweetmeats’ in 1828 in Eliza Leslie’s Receipts cookbook. In the early 19th century, there were two different uses for the name cup cake or cupcake. In previous centuries, before muffin tins were widely available, the cakes were often baked in individual pottery cups, ramekins, or molds and took their name from the cups they were baked in.

This is the use of the name that has remained, and the name of “cupcake” is now given to any small cake that is about the size of a teacup. The name “fairy cake” is a fanciful description of its size, which would be appropriate for a party of diminutive fairies to share. While English fairy cakes vary in size more than American cupcakes, they are traditionally smaller and are rarely topped with elaborate icing.

The other kind of “cup cake” referred to a cake whose ingredients were measured by volume, using a standard-sized cup, instead of being weighed. Recipes whose ingredients were measured using a standard-sized cup could also be baked in cups; however, they were more commonly baked in tins as layers or loaves. In later years, when the use of volume measurements was firmly established in home kitchens, these recipes became known as 1234 cakes or quarter cakes, so called because they are made up of four ingredients: one cup of butter, two cups of sugar, three cups of flour, and four eggs.

They are plain yellow cakes, somewhat less rich and less expensive than pound cake, due to using about half as much butter and eggs compared to pound cake. The names of these two major classes of cakes were intended to signal the method to the baker; “cup cake” uses a volume measurement, and “pound cake” uses a weight measurement. Cupcakes have become more than a trend over the years, they’ve become an industry!

Paper baking cups first hit U.S. markets after the end of the World War II. An artillery manufacturer called the James River Corporation began manufacturing cupcake liners for U.S. markets when its military markets began to diminish. By 1969, they consolidated business as a paper company and left artillery manufacturing behind.

During the 1950s, the paper baking cup gained popularity as U.S. housewives purchased them for convenience. Their flexibility grew when bakers realized that they could bake muffins as well as cupcakes in the baking cups. The modern idea of the cupcake is probably different from the historical origin of the phrase.

Imagine what it would be like being a cook in 19th-century Britain or North America. When food historians approach the topic of cupcakes, they run into a gray area in which the practice of making individual cup-sized cakes can become confused with the convention of making cakes with cup-measured ingredients. The notion of baking small cakes in individual containers probably began with the use of clay or earthenware mugs.

It could have been a way to use up extra batter; to make the most efficient use of a hot oven by placing small ramekins, or little baking dishes, in unused spaces; or to create an evenly baked product fast when fuel was in short supply. Early in the 20th century, the advent of multi-cupcake molded tins brought modest mass production methods to cupcake making, and a modern baking tradition was born. Cakes in some form have been around since ancient times, and today’s familiar round cakes with frosting can be traced back to the 17th century, made possible by advances in food technology such as: better ovens, metal cake molds and pans, and the refinement of sugar.

I got it at storify.com but I originally got it at Google Images.

image

Websites I used:

http://iml.jou.ufl.edu/projects/spring07/ayers/history.html

http://people.rit.edu/kge3737/320/project3/history.html

http://recipes.howstuffworks.com/food-facts/who-invented-the-cupcake.htm

http://inventors.about.com/od/cstartinventions/a/Who-Invented-The-Cupcake.htm

Books I Recommend: Anastasia by A.L. Singer

Hi there, everyone! This is the 24th book recommendation list. Have a great afternoon!

1. Anastasia by A.L. Singer
2. Arizona by Pat Ryan
3. Butterfly Watching by Diane Bair and Pamela Wright
4. The Little Butterfly by Sherry Shahan
5.Butterflies by Adele D. Richardson
6. Red, White, and Blue Goodbye by Sarah Wones Tomp
7. The Hard-Times Jar by Ethel Footman Smothers
8. The Golden Sandal by Rebecca Hickox
9. The Story of the Incredible Orchestra by Bruce Kosichelniak
10. Skit-Scat Raggedy Cat by Roxanne Orgill
11. I, Galileo by Bonnie Christensenhen
12. April Fool! Watch Out at School by Diane deGroat
13. Henry’s Dragon Kite by Bruce Edward Hall
14. The Butter Man by Elizabeth Alalou and Ali Alalou
15. New Hampshire by Deborah Kent
16. Arizona by Barbara A. Somervill
17. Utah by Deborah Kent
18. Nevada by Ann Heinrichs
19. Chocolate by Robert Burleigh
20. America the Beautiful by Katherine Lee Bates
21. No Talking by Andrew Clements
22. The Book Without Words by Avi
23. Cold in Summer by Tracy Barrett
24. Anything but Typical by Nora Raleigh Baskin
25. My Unwilling Sleeps Over by Hiawyn Oram
26. Monsters Don’t Scuba Dive by Debbie Dadey and Marcia Thornton Jones
27. Starting with Alice by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

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