Beauty in You

Hey, everyone! I’m sharing with you some beauty tips, health tips, and other tips. I hope you enjoy!

Using Coconut Oil:

Coconut oil is excellent for dental health. After brushing teeth with your regular toothpaste, put coconut oil on the toothbrush, and brush your gums and teeth. This will feel awesome. It leaves your teeth feeling smooth and freshens your breath. The toothpaste that I use is Auromère.

You can spread coconut oil on your bread or waffle before putting it in the toaster too.

Using Something to Keep Your Hair Out of Your Face:

I prefer headbands or bobby pins but you can use hairstyles, hats, clips, scrunchies, and more depending on your hair length. I suggest if you want to grow out your hair that you use bobby pins or headbands.

Putting Something on Your Eyes To Protect Your Eyes From Sunlight:

Select 100% UV protection sunglasses. You can get a design on your sunglasses that you like best. For example, flower sunglasses, summer sunglasses, fairy sunglasses, or princess sunglasses are all some suggestions.

The Food You Eat:

Healthy foods like organic fruit, organic vegetables, protein, healthy oils, water, and whole grains are mostly what I eat. If you want candy, get organic candy with no artificial colors, additives, preservatives, or high fructose corn syrup. If you want cookies, get organic cookies. If you want cake, make a homemade cake with organic ingredients and if you want chips, find organic chips at Whole Foods or Trader Joe’s or wherever you shop.

Exercise:

I suggest exercising once a week when you are just beginning exercising. Once you’ve gotten good at doing exercising once a week, do twice a week to make it a bit challenging. Repeat this until you’re doing it, 7 days a week.

Try using beginner yoga, wall sits, air cycle, windshield wipers with your feet. After that, you can try harder yoga and so on. You can use dancing, gymnastics, and walking to help you get stronger and flexible. You can try weight lifting but take it easy with weight lifting.

Paint Nails:

If you are going to use nail polish, try using Mineral Fusion or Zoya nail polish or any brand without harsh ingredients. If you can, leave your toes, hands, or both unpainted or put just a clear polish on your toes, hands, or both to make them look glossy.

Bathing:

Use Aveda shampoo and conditioner (or other brands with natural ingredients as what we use on our hair travels into our body) on your hair when you wash it. If you prefer every other bath/shower day to wash your hair, go for it. Camilla does it for me once a week.

I bathe with Whole Food’s scented soap most of the time. If I run out of scented soap, I use Dove’s unscented soap.

The Drinks You Drink:

I suggest drinking just plain spring water if you can. Better yet, to begin the day with squeezing half a lime or lemon in your water. This will help wake up the water. If you don’t like to drink water, try drinking juice at least once a day. Be sure to get fresh squeezed juice or fresh pressed juice. Stay away from juices that are made from concentrate.

Depending on your body, you might want to find out how many cups of drinks your body might want. For me, I drink 2 cups of water and 1 cup of juice. It’s still okay to drink something when you’re thirsty unless it’s wine, coffee, or any drink that makes you hyper.

Books I Recommend: The Song Reader by Lisa Tucker

Hey, everyone! This is my 52nd book recommendation. I hope you enjoy!

1. The Song Reader by Lisa Tucker

2. Scaredy Cat by Courtney Sheinmel

3. My Friends Call Me Sam by Monica McDivitt

4. The Complete Book of the Flower Fairies by Cicely Mary Barker

5. The Secret Book Club by Ann M. Martin

6. Fairies and Magical Creatures by Matthew Reinhart and Robert Sabuda

7. Julia the Sleeping Beauty Fairy by Daisy Meadows

8. Oh, Look! by Patricia Polacco

9. Sun and Moon by Lisa Desimini

10. Clever Ali by Nancy Farmer

11. The Snow Show with Chef Kelvin by Carolyn Fisher

12. Mythological Creatures by Lynn Curlee

13. Beauty, Her Basket by Sandra Belton

14. Maple by Lori Nichols

15. When The Shadbush Blooms by Carla Messinger with Susan Katz

16. A Christmas Tale by Geronimo Stilton

17. Stink and the Shark Sleepover by Megan McDonald

18. Lights! Camera! Cupcakes! by Coco Simon

19. Any Way You Slice It by Nancy Krulik

20. Drat! You Copycat! by Nancy Krulik

21. Horrible Harry and the Mud Gremlins by Suzy Kline

22. Bad Rap by Nancy Krulik

23. Sleeping Beauty by Catherine Hapka

24. The Case of the Class Clown by James Preller

25. The Little Mermaid by Amy Edgar

26. Princess Stories by Fiona Waters

27. Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle’s Farm by Betty MacDonald

28. Nuts to You by Lynne Rae Perkins

29. Lion by Jeff Stone

30. What the Witch Left by Ruth Chew

31. The Pilgrim Village Mystery by Gertrude Chandler Warner

32. I Am The Wallpaper by Mark Peter Hughes

33. Time Travel and Warp Drives by Allen and Thomas Roman

34. Walking to School by Eve Bunting

35. Super Simple Ice Projects by Kelly Doudna

36. Close-Up Magic by Nicholas Einhorn

37. Paper and Paint by Waterbirds Books

38. Look and Make With Paper by Sea-to-Sea Publications

39. Jackson Pollock by Clare Oliver

40. John Smith Escapes Again! by Rosalyn Schanzer

41. Wilma Unlimited by Kathleen Krull

42. Thumbelina by Brian Pinkney

43. Swans by Lynn M. Stone

44. Origami Activities by Michael G. LaFosse

45. The Period Book by Karen Gravelle and Jennifer Gravelle

46.  Billie Holiday by Bud Kliment

47. Walt Disney by Tamra B. Orr

48. For The Right To Learn by Rebecca Langston-George

49. The Kingfisher Nature Encyclopedia by David Burne

50. A Child’s Garden by Molly Dannenmaier

51. Across The Wide Dark Sea by Jean Van Leeuwen

52. Trick or Treat, Smell My Feet by Diane deGroat

53. I Pledge Allegiance by Pat Mora and Libby Martinez

54. Betas by Walt Mauraus

(The blue links you see are Amazon Affilates). 

Enchanted Egyptian Beauty

Hey there, everyone! Remember all the years in the past,  when I decided to sell copies of the Egyptian Eye? I decided to sell the copies of my Egyptian Eye again this year. Here is a poem about it.

Triangular prisms sprout rainbows
From the tip of a triangle, triangles peak everywhere
Amazing colorful teeth pointing toward a catchy circle
It is an Egyptian Beauty!

I hope you enjoyed my poem!


About the Egyptian Eye:

I made this Egyptian Eye masterpiece when I was young. (I can’t remember what date I finished it and started it). Camilla mentioned that it looked like an Egyptian Eye. So the name became Egyptian Eye. I used the Egyptian Eye drawing in 2010 for raising money for getting to the conference in San Antonio, TX. I decided that it went so well that I did it for the conference last year in Salt Lake City, UT. It was a great success last year and I wanted to do that idea again this year for San Antonio. Find out more at http://lilliandarnell.com/lillians-art/ for the pricing. Thanks to all of you got a copy of the Egyptian Eye.


 

About Me:

I am the artist of the Egyptian Eye. I am a soon to be abstract artist of abstract rocks, paintings, and drawings. Find out more about about me in my About Lillian page. Thank you!

Nature: Research for Carnations

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Hi there! Camilla has let me pick my own assignment. I chose a flower. I would have done more flowers but Camilla said to choose only one flower. So I chose carnation.

The single flowers of the Carnations species, Dianthus caryophyllus (that’s the scientific name) has 5 petals and they can vary from white to pink to purple in colors. Border Carnation cultivars may have double flowers with 1 to 40 petals. When they grow in gardens, Carnations grow to between 6 and 8.5 cm in diameter. Petals on Carnations are generally clawed or serrated.

Carnations are bisexual flowers and bloom simply or in a branched or forked cluster. The stamens on Carnations can occur in one or two whorls, in equal number or twice the number of the petals. The Carnation leaves are narrow and stalk less and their color varies from green to grey-blue or purple. Carnations grow big, full blooms on strong, straight stems. The carnation’s history dates back to ancient Greek and Roman times, when it was used in art and decor.

Christians or some spirituals believe that the first carnation bloomed on earth when Mary wept for Jesus as he carried his cross. Carnations in these early times were predominantly found in shades of pale pink and peach, but over the years the palette of available colors has grown to include red, yellow, white, purple, and even green. Throughout so many centuries of change, the popularity of the carnation has remained undiminished. The fact that the carnation continues to endure is a testament to its vast appeal.

The meanings of carnations include fascination, distinction, and love. Like many other flowers, different messages can also be expressed with the flower’s different color varieties. Light red carnations, for example, are often used to convey admiration, whereas the dark red version expresses deeper sentiments of love and affection. White carnations are associated with purity and luck, and pink carnations are often given as a sign of gratitude.

In the early part of the 20th century, carnations became the official flower of Mother’s Day in addition finding particular significance in many other cultures worldwide. To this day, carnations remain a favorite flower choice for many different occasions. They are immediately recognizable flowers, and they possess a charm and allure that continues to captivate people around the globe. In fact, in many parts of the world, the popularity of carnations surpasses that of any other flower including roses.

The powerful sentiments these flowers can express are a perfect complement to their classic beauty and long-lasting freshness. Carnation is a flowering plant that belongs to the family Caryophyllaceae. There are over 300 varieties of carnations that can be found throughout the world. These plants originate from Europe and Asia.

Carnations are cultivated at least 2000 years because of their beautiful flowers and intense fragrance. Carnations require well drained soil, enough moisture and direct sunlight for successful growth. These flowers are symbol of labor movement and mother’s love in the most countries of the world. Some people in France believe that carnations symbolize bad luck, where they are used mostly for the preparation of funeral bouquets. Carnation is a herbaceous plant that can reach 31 inches in height.

Carnation has 6 inches long slender leaves. They are usually grayish or bluish green in color and covered with waxy substance. White carnations will change its color after adding food coloring to the water. The flower will change its color after 24 hours.

Dianthus is Latin which for “flower of the gods”. White carnations are inevitable part of wedding bouquets and bouquets prepared for the first wedding anniversary. Carnations are birth flowers for all people that are born in January. These flowers are often used as decoration for tuxedoes.

Bouquets made of pink carnations are traditionally prepared for Mother’s day. Colombia is the greatest producer of carnations in the world. Carnations are national flowers of countries such as Monaco, Spain, Slovenia and Ohio. They are also used as a symbol of different fraternities and sororities.

Carnations can propagate via seeds and plant cuttings. Carnations are perennial plants, which mean that they can live more than 2 years. Carnations also have long lifespan in the vase – they can remain fresh up to 14 days after removal from the ground.

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This is the website I got the image from even though I found it on Google Images: http://www.list-of-birthstones.com/birth%20flowers/Pictures%20of%20birth%20flowers/carnation%20flower.jpg

Sources I Used:

http://www.theflowerexpert.com/content/mostpopularflowers/carnations

http://www.proflowers.com/blog/history-and-meaning-of-carnations

http://www.softschools.com/facts/plants/carnation_facts/637/

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