Amazing Abstract Handmade Notebooks

Hey, everyone! Every year around this time, I like to create something to fundraise and help my family attend the annual Chromosome 18p- conference. This year I am creating handmade notebooks which can be customized. Here’s a poem to go with the notebook:

Notebook

N is for Nature

O is for Outstanding

T is for Terrific

E is for Eager Writing

B is for Book

O is for Outrageous

O is for Ocean

K is for Kindness

The price offering is at least $25 which includes shipping. You can use this PayPal link or you can mail a check to my mother, Camilla Downs, P.O. 19812, Reno, NV 89511

https://www.paypal.me/camilladowns

 

My handmade notebook example.

You can also purchase prints of my artwork by going here: http://lilliandarnell.com/lillians-art/

The Play of Art: History Of Art

Hey, everyone! This play will help you learn about the history of art. For those who like art will probably be interested in the history of art. You can use this play for school and other educational uses if you want to.

Narrator: Welcome to History of Art! Let the play begin.

(Princess enters from Stage A).

Princess (dancing): Nobody knew exactly when the first people started producing art but it is believed that art has been created far back as 100, 000 years ago.

(Strawberry enters from Stage B; Princess exits to Stage B).

Strawberry (smiling bravely): The earliest art work came from Africa in form of stone carvings. There are many examples of cave paintings and carvings from Africa and Europe dating back to 32,000 B.C.

(Princess enters: Strawberry moves to the right of the stage to listen).

Princess: About 9, 000 B.C., people began to change from being traveling nomads to settling down in villages. At this time the art began to evolve into larger pieces. In West Asia and Egypt, the first stone and clay statues were created and that is how artists began to create decorated pottery.

Strawberry: About 3, 000 B.C., people learned how to work with metals and began to create small pieces of art from bronze which was often small statuettes. This was the era when people in Greece and India began to create art and in Egypt, sculptors were large, lifelike stone statues which were painted realistically and were life-size.

Princess: The Dark Age which was around 1, 000 B.C. in East Asia and the Mediterranean Sea led to most people not being able to afford art. Artists stopped making their pieces for several hundred years.

Strawberry: After the Dark Age, it was in Greece that the Archaic and the Classical sculpture was started, along with the black-figure and red-figure vase paintings.

Princess: The Etruscans in Italy started to create large stone and clay statues as well as painted pottery they created.

Strawberry: Things changed when Alexander the Great conquered West Asia in 325 B.C. and people were able to travel throughout the empire. Ideas about art were exchanged and this lead to the first Greek stone statues reaching India with Indian sculptors following Greek methods to carve large statues of Buddha.

Princess: The rise of the Roman Empire spread Greek art to the West as well with artists in North Africa and  North Europe creating pieces of art in the Roman style.

Strawberry: This Roman time was when blown glass became a form of art. It was invented by Phoenician artists  and sold both to England and China.

Princess: In 200 A.D., artists began to experiment and moved away from realistic painting and sculptures to a more abstract form. Statues with larger eyes were to indicate that the subject has a strong soul.

Strawberry: There was a second Dark Age in 459 A.D. after the autumn in Rome. Sadly, not very much art was made for several hundred years.

Princess: In China during this time, they began to make new kinds of painting using a new invention that we use today called paper.

(Princess exited to Stage A). 

Strawberry: In Medieval times, art was evolving and showing the world differently. Christianity became a big theme like Islam did.

Narrator: I hope you enjoyed our play about the History of Art.

(Princess re enters through Stage B). 

(The narrator, Princess, and Strawberry all bow/ curtsy at the same time). 

The End.

Image result for old art

Old Town #4

Lillian’s Paper Airplane Craft

Hey, everyone! Today I’m going to be showing you how to make a easy indoor paper airplane that flies far and upside down. Here’s a little info about it: This paper airplane was inspired by the book Championship Paper Planes by Paul Jackson. It can fly upside down, straight, upward, downward, and any other way you can imagine. Let’s begin!

Here’s a picture of how it should look when it’s done without glitter:

What You’ll Need:

Printer Paper
Markers (optional)
Colored Pencil (optional)
Glitter (optional)

How to Make It:

First, fold the paper hot dog style.
Second, unfold and you should see a crease down the middle.
Third, fold a large triangle along the crease.
Fourth, fold a smaller triangle on the other side of the crease. You should see that it’s overlapped.
Fifth, fold again. You should see the engine where you’ll hold it at.
Sixth, fold the triangles over to form the wings.
Seventh, hold it up underneath the crooked wings to make it nice looking.
Eighth, experiment and test the paper airplane.

Tips:

The crookedness gives the paper airplane power.

Try flying it in a room with not too much stuff in it.

Fold the nose (the tip of the paper airplane) down and you will see many more tricks and stunts.

Try coming up with a name for your paper airplane (so if you have a lot paper airplanes, you’ll be able to find it).

If you have any questions based on this craft, comment the question below and I’ll answer it for you. Thank you!

This blog post includes an Amazon Affiliates link. 

Books I Recommend: The Biggest Snowball Ever! by John Rogan

Hey, everyone! This is my 43rd book recommendation. I hope you enjoy!

1. The Biggest Snowball Ever! by John Rogan

2. Gifts of the Heart by Patricia Polacco

3. For the Love of Autumn by Patricia Polacco

4. The Art of Miss Chew by Patricia Polacco

5. The Bee Tree by Patricia Polacco

6. Abstract Expressionism by Richard Spilsbury

7.  Ramona Quimby, Age 8 by Beverly Cleary

8.  Where Is Mount Everest? by Nico Medina

9. Here And Now by Michael Bond

10. Where Is Mount Rushmore? by True Kelley

11. Where Is the White House? by Megan Stine

12. Scarlett the Garnet Fairy by Daisy Meadows

13. What Was D-Day? by Patricia Brennan Demuth

14. Electric Storm by Anne Capeci

15. The California Current by Stan Ulanski

16. The Warm Place by Nancy Farmer

17. Hayley the Rain Fairy by Daisy Meadows

18. Sir Francis Drake and the Struggle for an Ocean Empire by Alice Smith Duncan

19. Wilhelm Roentgen and the Discovery of X Rays by Kimberly Garcia

20. Juliet the Valentine Fairy by Daisy Meadows

27. Monday with a Mad Genius by Mary Pope Osborne

28.  Sophie the Sapphire Fairy by Daisy Meadows

29. A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett

30. Pippi in the South Seas by Astrid Lindgren

31. Jade the Disco Fairy by Daisy Meadows

32. Afternoon on the Amazon by Mary Pope Osborne

33. The Lincoln Project by Dan Gutman

34. The Boy On The Wooden Box by Leon Leyson with Mary J. Harran and Elisabeth B. Leyson

35. Crystal the Snow Fairy by Daisy Meadows

36. Stella the Star Fairy by Daisy Meadows

37.  Luna and The Well of Secrets by J. H. Sweet

38.  Spectacles by Ellen Raskin

39. Pax by Sara Pennypacker

40. Ballet Stories by Noel Streatfeild

41. Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder

42. Three Cups of Tea by Greg Mortenson and David Oliver Relin

43. The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

44. Greenling by Levi Pinfold

(The blue links are Amazon Affiliates.)

Books I Recommend: Thanking the Moon by Grace Lin

Hey there, everyone! This is my 28th book recommendation. Thanks so much for participating!

1. Thanking the Moonby Grace Lin
2. Catching The Moonby Myla Goldberg
3. Abuelita’s Heartby Amy Córdova
4. Brown Girl Dreamby Jacqueline Woodson
5. The World Almanac for Kids 2013by Infobase Learning
6. How to Read the Solar Systemby Chris North and Paul G. Abel
7.Fairy Heaven and the Quest for the Wandby Gail Carson Levine
8. Phenomenaby Donna M. Jackson
9. The Princesses Collectionby Ann Braybrooks
10. Making Amazing Artby Sandi Henry
11. Lili on Stageby Rachel Isadora
12. Follow the Drinking Gourdby Cari Meister
13. The Red Threadby Grace Lin
14. Rules of Summerby Shaun Tan
15. Soccer on Sundayby Mary Pope Osborne
16. The Year of the Babyby Andrea Cheng
17. The Ghost Ship Mysteryby Gertrude Chandler Warner
18. Red Thread Sistersby Carol Antoinette Peacock
19. Three Adventures of the Boxcar Childrenby Gertrude Chandler Warner
20. Schoolhouse Mysteryby Gertrude Chandler Warner
21. The Movie Star Mysteryby Gertrude Chandler Warner
22. The Eagleby Cynthia Rylant
23. The Year of the Fortune Cookieby Andrea Cheng
24. The Mystery of the Grinning Gargoyleby Gertrude Chandler Warner
25. Caitlin the Ice Bearby Daisy Meadows
26. The Wide Awake Princessby E.D. Baker
27. Secret at the Chocolate Mansionby Leslie Margolis
28. The Enchanted Guideby Julie Ferris
29. The 10 Best Anxiety Bustersby Dr. Margaret Wehrenburg
30. The Swiss Family Robinsonby Johann Wyss
31. Serafina’s Promiseby Ann E. Burg

(amazon affiliate links)

Nature: Research for Carnations

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Hi there! Camilla has let me pick my own assignment. I chose a flower. I would have done more flowers but Camilla said to choose only one flower. So I chose carnation.

The single flowers of the Carnations species, Dianthus caryophyllus (that’s the scientific name) has 5 petals and they can vary from white to pink to purple in colors. Border Carnation cultivars may have double flowers with 1 to 40 petals. When they grow in gardens, Carnations grow to between 6 and 8.5 cm in diameter. Petals on Carnations are generally clawed or serrated.

Carnations are bisexual flowers and bloom simply or in a branched or forked cluster. The stamens on Carnations can occur in one or two whorls, in equal number or twice the number of the petals. The Carnation leaves are narrow and stalk less and their color varies from green to grey-blue or purple. Carnations grow big, full blooms on strong, straight stems. The carnation’s history dates back to ancient Greek and Roman times, when it was used in art and decor.

Christians or some spirituals believe that the first carnation bloomed on earth when Mary wept for Jesus as he carried his cross. Carnations in these early times were predominantly found in shades of pale pink and peach, but over the years the palette of available colors has grown to include red, yellow, white, purple, and even green. Throughout so many centuries of change, the popularity of the carnation has remained undiminished. The fact that the carnation continues to endure is a testament to its vast appeal.

The meanings of carnations include fascination, distinction, and love. Like many other flowers, different messages can also be expressed with the flower’s different color varieties. Light red carnations, for example, are often used to convey admiration, whereas the dark red version expresses deeper sentiments of love and affection. White carnations are associated with purity and luck, and pink carnations are often given as a sign of gratitude.

In the early part of the 20th century, carnations became the official flower of Mother’s Day in addition finding particular significance in many other cultures worldwide. To this day, carnations remain a favorite flower choice for many different occasions. They are immediately recognizable flowers, and they possess a charm and allure that continues to captivate people around the globe. In fact, in many parts of the world, the popularity of carnations surpasses that of any other flower including roses.

The powerful sentiments these flowers can express are a perfect complement to their classic beauty and long-lasting freshness. Carnation is a flowering plant that belongs to the family Caryophyllaceae. There are over 300 varieties of carnations that can be found throughout the world. These plants originate from Europe and Asia.

Carnations are cultivated at least 2000 years because of their beautiful flowers and intense fragrance. Carnations require well drained soil, enough moisture and direct sunlight for successful growth. These flowers are symbol of labor movement and mother’s love in the most countries of the world. Some people in France believe that carnations symbolize bad luck, where they are used mostly for the preparation of funeral bouquets. Carnation is a herbaceous plant that can reach 31 inches in height.

Carnation has 6 inches long slender leaves. They are usually grayish or bluish green in color and covered with waxy substance. White carnations will change its color after adding food coloring to the water. The flower will change its color after 24 hours.

Dianthus is Latin which for “flower of the gods”. White carnations are inevitable part of wedding bouquets and bouquets prepared for the first wedding anniversary. Carnations are birth flowers for all people that are born in January. These flowers are often used as decoration for tuxedoes.

Bouquets made of pink carnations are traditionally prepared for Mother’s day. Colombia is the greatest producer of carnations in the world. Carnations are national flowers of countries such as Monaco, Spain, Slovenia and Ohio. They are also used as a symbol of different fraternities and sororities.

Carnations can propagate via seeds and plant cuttings. Carnations are perennial plants, which mean that they can live more than 2 years. Carnations also have long lifespan in the vase – they can remain fresh up to 14 days after removal from the ground.

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This is the website I got the image from even though I found it on Google Images: http://www.list-of-birthstones.com/birth%20flowers/Pictures%20of%20birth%20flowers/carnation%20flower.jpg

Sources I Used:

http://www.theflowerexpert.com/content/mostpopularflowers/carnations

http://www.proflowers.com/blog/history-and-meaning-of-carnations

http://www.softschools.com/facts/plants/carnation_facts/637/

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A View Of A Princess’s Life

Hi there! Camilla decided that I write a blogpost on whatever I like once a week. You’re about to enter a princess’s life at her birth.

There once lived Queen Lilliana and King Topaz who yearned to have a child (specifically a daughter). One day later, the Queen had a baby girl and the King and the Queen were very happy. They had a christening/baby shower/ party and everyone in the kingdom came.

Everyone watched the queen name the baby. The queen had selected Melody as her name. When Melody was one year old, she talked like a princess should.

She was 3, when she learned to walk like a princess. She was 5 when she was crowned. She began to study at age 7. She got a new bed at 9 years old.

She started washing her hair at 11 years old. She started brushing her hair at 13 years old. She started getting dressed at age 15. She then started liking young princes at school during her 16th year.

She started getting boyfriends in her 17th year. She started dates with boys in her 18th year. She found the perfect boy to marry in her 19th year. She planned the wedding in her 20th year.

She got married in her 21st year. She had babies in her 22nd year. In the 23rd year, she went to work.

In her 24th year, her husband died. In her 25th year, she became ill. In her 26th year, she died but her parents still remember her.

So to remember her, they built a statue, made a speech, a museum, some art, some pictures and some books. Her parents died shortly after all that was done. Her children took place of the throne.

Nobody forgot her. So when they died, they joined her so she didn’t get lonely.

There’s a lesson and the lesson is you should always honor someone after they die especially if that person is special.

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I got this photo at eBay.com but specifically http://www.googleimages.com/.

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Books I Recommend: Willowood by Cecilia Galente

Hi there! This is the 16th book recommendation list!

1. Willowoodby Cecilia Galente
2. The Magic Cake Shopby Meilea Hashimoto
3. Have Wheels, Will Travelby Anne Mazer
4. Water Balloonby Audrey Vernick
5. Recipes for Art and Craft Materialsby Helen Roney Sattler
6. The Summer of Mayby Cecilia Galente
7. Pocahontasby Joseph Bruchac
8. Darkbeastby Morgan Keyes
9. The Wishby Gail Carson Levine
10. Rosetta’s Daring Dayby Disney
11. The Agony of Aliceby Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
12. Dragon’s Breathby E.D. Baker
13. Shadows & Moonshineby Joan Aiken
14. Ida B.by Kate Hannigan
15. The First Two Lives of Lukas-Kashaby Lloyd Alexander
16. Gypsy Rizkaby Lloyd Alexander
17. Snapby Alison McGhee
18. Dolphins and Porpoisesby Stuart A. Kallen
19. Experiments with Rocks and Mineralsby Carol Hand
20. The Magic School Bus on the Ocean Floorby Joanna Cole

(amazon affilates above)