Rachel Carson

Rachel Carson was born in May 27, 1907 in Springdale, Pennsylvania near the Allegheny River. It was the perfect place to fall in love with nature and that’s how she became inspired to be a writer and marine biologist.   If Rachel Carson was imagine how popular she’d be even though she was 107 years old! Imagine someone that old!

Robert and Maria Carson which were Rachel’s parents met in the winter of 1879 when they both sang at a musical social chorus. They fell in love, got married, and had children who were Marian Frazer, Robert, and Rachel.

As a little girl, Rachel helped the farm pets around the farm. She had a lot fabulous teachers. Her first great teacher was her mother Maria who loved books and music. Her mother introduced her to literature and nature while  diseases struck the town of Springdale, PA. Rachel also loved to read and write. Around age eight, Rachel wrote her first book called The Little Brown House. On April 14, 1964, she died of a heart failure after a long battle with breast cancer.

Chronology of Rachel Carson’s Life and Work

1907 May 27

Carson born in Springdale, Pa.

1918 September

Published first story in St. Nicholas Magazine

1925 -1929

Carson attends Pennsylvania College for Women; majors in science.

Carson goes to Woods Hole, MA to study marine biology.

Begins graduate work in zoology at Johns Hopkins University

1932 May

Graduates with MA in zoology from Hopkins; goes again to Woods Hole to study at Bureau of Fisheries.

1935

Writes radio scripts for Bureau of Fisheries and publishes articles on natural history of the Chesapeake Bay for The Baltimore Sun. Writes “The World of Water” later published as “Undersea” in The Atlantic Monthly, September, 1937.

Father, Robert Carson dies.

1936 -1952

Appointed Junior Aquatic Biologist with the Bureau of Fisheries, U.S. Department of Commerce. Becomes staff biologist with the US Fish and Wildlife Service,

1939

retires as editor in chief of all USFWS publications.

1937

Sister, Marian Carson Williams dies, leaving two daughters Virginia and Marjorie who live with Rachel and her mother.

1941

Under the Sea-wind. A Naturalist’s Picture of Ocean Life published by Simon& Schuster.

1947

Publishes first of five pamphlets in Conservation in Action series for USFWS.

1950

Confirmed breast tumor removed. No further treatment.

1951

The Sea Around Us., excerpted in “Profiles” of The New Yorker. The Sea Around Us published by Oxford University Press. Resigns from Government service to write full time.

1952

National Book Award for Non-fiction for The Sea Around Us; Roger Christie, Marjorie’s son born. RKO film version released; Awarded the John Burroughs Medal, April 1952. The Henry Grier Bryant Gold Medal, Geographical Society New York Zoological Society Gold Medal. Awarded a Simon Guggenheim Fellowship for research on tidal life.

1955

The Edge of the Sea published by Houghton Mifflin Co.

1956

July “Help Your Child to Wonder,” Women’s Home Companion. Published posthumously as The Sense of Wonder, Harper& Row, 1965.

1957

Rachel adopts Roger Christie after the death of his mother.

1960 April

Carson has radical mastectomy for breast cancer.

1962 June

First of three installments of Silent Spring published as Reporter at Large in The New Yorker September Silent Spring published by Houghton Mifflin December Silent Spring, a book-of-the-month club selection

1963 January

Albert Schweitzer award from Animal Welfare Institute April 3 CBS Reports airs “The Silent Spring of Rachel Carson.”

1963 June 3

Carson testifies on the misuse of pesticides; US Senate Subcommittee of Government Operations. 88th Cong. 1st.sess.

1963 June 6

Carson testifies before the US Senate Committee on Commerce December Awarded the National Audubon Society Medal. Inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

1964 April 14

Carson dies in Silver Spring, Md. at age 56.

The sources I used were:

Who on Earth is Rachel Carson by Glenn Scherer

 

Rachel Carson was born in May 27, 1907 in Springdale, Pennsylvania near the Allegheny River. It was the perfect place to fall in love with nature and that’s how she became inspired to be a writer and marine biologist.   If Rachel Carson was imagine how popular she’d be even though she was 107 years old! Imagine someone that old!

 

Robert and Maria Carson which were Rachel’s parents met in the winter of 1879 when they both sang at a musical social chorus. They fell in love, got married, and had children who were Marian Frazer, Robert, and Rachel.

 

As a little girl, Rachel helped the farm pets around the farm. She had a lot fabulous teachers. Her first great teacher was her mother Maria who loved books and music. Her mother introduced her to literature and nature while  diseases struck the town of Springdale, PA. Rachel also loved to read and write. Around age eight, Rachel wrote her first book called The Little Brown House. On April 14, 1964, she died of a heart failure after a long battle with breast cancer.

 

Chronology of Rachel Carson’s Life and Work

1907 May 27

Carson born in Springdale, Pa.

1918 September

Published first story in St. Nicholas Magazine

1925 -1929

Carson attends Pennsylvania College for Women; majors in science.

Carson goes to Woods Hole, MA to study marine biology.

Begins graduate work in zoology at Johns Hopkins University

1932 May

Graduates with MA in zoology from Hopkins; goes again to Woods Hole to study at Bureau of Fisheries.

1935

Writes radio scripts for Bureau of Fisheries and publishes articles on natural history of the Chesapeake Bay for The Baltimore Sun. Writes “The World of Water” later published as “Undersea” in The Atlantic Monthly, September, 1937.

Father, Robert Carson dies.

1936 -1952

Appointed Junior Aquatic Biologist with the Bureau of Fisheries, U.S. Department of Commerce. Becomes staff biologist with the US Fish and Wildlife Service,

1939

retires as editor in chief of all USFWS publications.

1937

Sister, Marian Carson Williams dies, leaving two daughters Virginia and Marjorie who live with Rachel and her mother.

1941

Under the Sea-wind. A Naturalist’s Picture of Ocean Life published by Simon& Schuster.

1947

Publishes first of five pamphlets in Conservation in Action series for USFWS.

1950

Confirmed breast tumor removed. No further treatment.

1951

The Sea Around Us., excerpted in “Profiles” of The New Yorker. The Sea Around Us published by Oxford University Press. Resigns from Government service to write full time.

1952

National Book Award for Non-fiction for The Sea Around Us; Roger Christie, Marjorie’s son born. RKO film version released; Awarded the John Burroughs Medal, April 1952. The Henry Grier Bryant Gold Medal, Geographical Society New York Zoological Society Gold Medal. Awarded a Simon Guggenheim Fellowship for research on tidal life.

1955

The Edge of the Sea published by Houghton Mifflin Co.

1956

July “Help Your Child to Wonder,” Women’s Home Companion. Published posthumously as The Sense of Wonder, Harper& Row, 1965.

1957

Rachel adopts Roger Christie after the death of his mother.

1960 April

Carson has radical mastectomy for breast cancer.

1962 June

First of three installments of Silent Spring published as Reporter at Large in The New Yorker September Silent Spring published by Houghton Mifflin December Silent Spring, a book-of-the-month club selection

1963 January

Albert Schweitzer award from Animal Welfare Institute April 3 CBS Reports airs “The Silent Spring of Rachel Carson.”

1963 June 3

Carson testifies on the misuse of pesticides; US Senate Subcommittee of Government Operations. 88th Cong. 1st.sess.

1963 June 6

Carson testifies before the US Senate Committee on Commerce December Awarded the National Audubon Society Medal. Inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

1964 April 14

Carson dies in Silver Spring, Md. at age 56.

The sources I used were:

 

Who on Earth is Rachel Carson by Glenn Scherer

 

 

Tiger

Facts: The largest of all the Asian big cats, tigers rely primarily on sight and sound rather than smell. They typically hunt alone and stalk prey. A tiger can consume up to 88 pounds of meat at one time. On average, tigers give birth to 2-3 cubs every 2-2.5 years. If all the cubs in one litter die, a second litter may be produced within 5 months.

Tigers generally gain independence at two years of age and attain sexual maturity at 3-4 years for females and at 4-5 years for males. Juvenile mortality is high however—about half of all cubs do not survive more than two years. Tigers have been known to reach the age of 26 years in the wild. Across their range, tigers face unrelenting pressure from poaching, retaliatory killings and habitat loss. They are forced to compete for space with dense and often growing human populations.

Explanation: The animal pictures Billie sent made me get the idea!

Photos:

20140807-174607.jpg

20140807-174625.jpg

Guinea Pig

Facts:

Guinea pigs are tail-less rodents that are native to the west coast of South America and since the mid-1800′s, laboratories have used them for research. The correct name for guinea pigs is Cavy, pronounced “kay-vee”.
Guinea pigs usually weigh around 3 ounces at birth, around 1-2 pounds full grown, and live for 5-6 years. An adult will measure 8-10 inches from the tip of its nose to the end of its rump. Their hair comes in a wide range of colors and the hair may be long, short or short and curly. Cavies have a very good sense of smell and sensitive hearing. They love to vocalize with squeals, chirps, squeaks, and whistles. Although not known for their intelligence, they do recognize their owners and will seek them out and return affection.

Explanation: Lovey wanted this because she doesn’t have another guinea pig friend and she’s worried about other guinea pigs.

Notice: Guinea pigs aren’t endangered!

20140806-190650.jpg

20140806-190757.jpg

Ant-Blue Butterfly

Facts: Acrodipsas illidgei is an endangered butterfly inhabiting mangrove forests in southeastern Queensland, Australia. Concern over the effects of mosquito control activities prompted a broad-scale survey for the species at Coomera Island, in southeastern Queensland. The butterfly was recorded on the edge of an old-growth mangrove forest in close proximity to mosquito control runnels. Other forms of mosquito control at Coomera Island are unlikely to impact on the species because of the mode of action of larvicides used and the fact larvae occur within ant colonies formed in hollow stems and branches of mangrove trees. Further studies are required to more fully understand the relationships between mosquito control activities and the population dynamics of endangered species such as A. illidgei.

Explanation: I chose this because I was just scrolling around!

20140806-194835.jpg

Polar Bear

Facts:

New evidence suggests that the polar bear, Ursus maritimus, or the sea bear, started to evolve about five million years ago from brown bear ancestors. Unlike their land-based cousins, polar bears are superbly adapted for survival in the Far North on a sea ice habitat.
Polar bears live in the Arctic in areas where theyhunt seals at openings in sea ice called leads. Five nations have polar bear populations: the United States (Alaska), Canada, Russia, Greenland, and Norway.

Polar bears top the food chain in the Arctic, where they prey primarily on ringed seals. They reach these seals from a platform of sea ice.

Adult male polar bears weigh from 775 to 1,200 pounds. A few weigh more than 1,200 pounds, but these individuals would be exceptional. Females normally weigh 330 to 650 pounds. It’s not uncommon for female polar bears preparing to enter maternity dens in the fall to weigh over 600 pounds.

Females usually bear two cubs. Single cubs and triplets also occur depending on the health and condition of the mother. Cubs stay with their moms for up to 2-1/2 years, learning how to hunt and survive in the harsh arctic environment. Polar bears live in the circumpolar north in areas where they can hunt seals at openings in the sea ice called leads. They are found in Canada (home to roughly 60% of the world’s polar bears), the U.S. (Alaska), Greenland, Russia, and Norway (the Svalbard archipelago). Scientists have identified 19 populations of polar bears living in four differentice regions in the Arctic. Although popular art and children’s books often show polar bears and penguins together, the two live at opposite poles. Polar bears live in the Arctic. Penguins live in Antarctica.

Explanation: Thomas knew that polar bear was a bear and it was endangered and that is why he chose this animal!

20140806-192819.jpg

July’s Monthly Story

Fruit Fashion

One day a strawberry named Juicy Fashion was walking and said,”Perfect day for fashion”. She accidentally bumped into a blueberry named Tamed Blueberry at the moment. He said,”What a fantastic idea”. So they sent out invitations. Orange said she’d come. So did all the other fruits. All the males had to be judges, audience, and attendants while females could be in the fashion show. You’ll never guess who won the fashion show is! Did I hear you say Juicy Fashion? Well your correct! She got a large trophy and a piece of fruit cake. Everyone congratulated her!

The End

People To Thank For The Conference

Hi there! Click here for Thomas’s version of this thank-you post!

 

I’d like to thank Justin Hope Foundation, Robert Downs, Nevada Government’s Council On Development Disabilities, Patty Romano, and Frank Romano.

 

My favorite part of the conference was hanging out with my friends in the pool and anywhere else in the hotel. The feeling felt great, excited, and good!

New! Monthly Stories

Hi y’all! For For all story-lovers even authors that I know are welcome to join! This just might be inspiration for many authors out there!

Every month, I’ll give out a story including July! You can pick a genre you want me to write if you want to they’ll be right here as a poll!

Book Genres
  
pollcode.com free polls 

 

But for now I’ll  do one for this month. By the way, type your answer of what you’ve selected for the stories in the comment box!

Reading Game

This game is so fun. It perhaps might even help you get ready for an event and more!

 

Circulation (also known as rotation) Reading Game

What you’ll need is:
Books (optional)
Time

How To Play:

  1. You’ll choose a room to read in.
  2. Then repeat step number 1. (This is where the rotation comes in).
  3. While you’re in a room if you need to, grab any materials or supplies you might need.
Enjoy the game!