The Last Cookie: Cookies For Everyone

Hey, everyone! Here’s the second part of the Last Cookie story! I hope you enjoy.

Mermaidia had a solution finally and it was to suggest cut the cookie in half. (If you’re wondering, the cookie flavor is fruit punch.) Mermaidia looked around trying to find Bellina.

Mermaidia found Bellina in the kitchen, preparing to eat the cookie. Finally Mermaidia reached Bellina. Mermaidia said,” I have something to say to you.” Bellina asked,” What do you want to say to me, Mermaidia?” So Mermaidia asked Bellina, “Here’s what I want to say to you, may I have half of your cookie please?”

That’s the end of part 2 of The Last Cookie. What do you think Bellina said to Mermaidia? Where do you think Mermaidia sat down to think of the solution? Tune in Tuesday for the 3rd part of The Last Cookie!

Yummy Snickerdoodles!

Subscribe to Lillian Darnell by Email

I help to support my family with my writings. I share my writings for free for the benefit of others. If you benefit from this writing, would you like to toss a tip in the love offering “bucket”? Oceans of love and gratefulness …xoxo

The Last Cookie

Hey, everyone! I decided to start a new blog series called The Last Cookie. Hope you enjoy!

A Cookie For Everyone! 

Once there lived a young fairy princess who was half mermaid, royal human, and flying human.  Her name was Mermaidia Princess Fairy-Alia. Mermaida danced, swam, walked, and flew so good. One day, she flew to the cookie box and she turned into a princess again when she said, “I am proud to be a fairy but can you transform me back into a princess.”

Suddenly her sister named Bellina flew in and grabbed the final cookie which Mermaidia had wanted so badly. She sat down to think of a solution.

This is the end of Part 1 of the cookie series. What solution do you think Mermaidia thought? What flavor do you think the flavor was? Tune in this weekend for the 2nd part of The Last Cookie to find the answer to both questions.

Yummy Cookies!

Subscribe to Lillian Darnell by Email

I help to support my family with my writings. I share my writings for free for the benefit of others. If you benefit from this writing, would you like to toss a tip in the love offering “bucket”? Oceans of love and gratefulness …xoxo

Emotions With Animals: Fearful Fish

Hey, everyone! Welcome back to this week’s edition of Emotions With Animals! As you know summer is almost and I did a weekly story with a sprinkle of summer in it. Go to Mischievous Popsicles to read it. I decided to post this edition a day early!

Fearful fish look into a mirror or reflection. Depending on the type of fish they may quarrel their reflection. Some fishes don’t see well.

Fearful people can get hurt backs, stubbornness, dizziness, and more. Being fearful can be dangerous if you’re not careful.

How To Be Fearless:

Aware: Notice when you experience feelings of fear.

Remind: Next time you notice the fear inside you, remind yourself that it’s ‘all in the mind’ and that ‘80% of fears never happen’.

Ask: Ask yourself ‘what’s the worst thing that can happen if I do this?’. Ask yourself ‘how is this fear impacting my life?’

Write: Write down a few ways to deal with the worst case scenario – often when we get our thoughts out of our heads and down onto paper the fear will disappear.

Get Rid of Fears: Take a deep breath and overcome your fears. You should listen to your body. It will tell you when it’s ready.

Fearful: It’s okay to be fearful.

Thinking: The thoughts you are having might be keeping you from being fearless.

Feelings: Your emotions might also keep you from being fearless. Notice your thoughts and ask yourself,”Is that true?” Physically, feel the feeling. (This blogpost may help). See the section Asking for more.

Patient: Be patient with yourself.

Quiet: Be quiet and still. Saying to yourself you will progress through your fears.

I hope you enjoyed my blog post. Tune in the Friday after this Friday for the next edition of Emotions With Animals! Visit Camilla’s blog at Mindful Musings for more blog posts.

Beautiful Blue Fish!

Subscribe to Lillian Darnell by Email

I help to support my family with my writings. I share my writings for free for the benefit of others. If you benefit from this writing, would you like to toss a tip in the love offering “bucket”? Oceans of love and gratefulness …xoxo

Emotions With Animals: Mischievous Pelicans

Hey there, everyone! Welcome back to this week’s edition of Emotions With Animals! I recently posted tons of blog posts. Go to http://lilliandarnell.com/2016/05/26/graceful-planets/ to see some of them.

Mischievous pelicans eat fish with their beak and their see-through pouch open. Pelicans will look silly mischievous.

Mischievous people giggle nervously. If you ask someone,”Are you hiding something?” and they might reply no to you. Be careful not to get mischievous yourself!

How To Not Be Mischievous:

Channel Mischief: Channel your mischief into curiosity for things.

Transform: Transform your mischief into a learning experience to keep from doing something dangerous or get you in trouble.

Connecting: Connect with the feeling that comes with mischievous. After you finish connecting with it, go for a walk in nature or anything that will channel the mischief to something (see Channel Mischief for more).

I hope you enjoyed my blog post! Go to Camilla’s website at Mindful Musings if you want to see more. Click on the 2nd link below if you like what I write.

Pelicans In Flight

Subscribe to Lillian Darnell by Email

I help to support my family with my writings. I share my writings for free for the benefit of others. If you benefit from this writing, would you like to toss a tip in the love offering “bucket”? Oceans of gratitude … xoxo

Emotions With Animals: Jealous Parrots

Hey, everyone! I recently wrote Angry Candy StoryEmotions With Animals: Angry DucksA Sad Princess StoryEmotions With Animals: Sad CatsA Happy FairyHappy DogsA Mindful Mermaid Story, and Mindful Goslings. Welcome back to a weekly edition of Emotions With Animals!

Jealous parrots might fan their tails and chatter loudly. The parrots might screech. The parrots might even try to scratch or bite a new animal. Occasionally, jealous parrots turn their feelings inward and start pulling out their own feathers.

Jealous people might find a way to get away from you. The jealous people might be thinking, “I wish I had that.” or “I really want that” instead of being grateful for what they have. If you aren’t careful enough, you might get jealous and pack the jealousness deep into your body and cause pain and difficulty.

How To Stop The Jealousy:

Examine Your Actions And Intentions:

Look deep inside your body and ask yourself, are you doing or saying anything that could be worsening their feelings of jealousy? Are they in a bad place in their life and have you not been attentive enough of their needs?

Telling the Truth:

Tell the person that you were jealous can make you feel a lot better. Take the time to talk about it with the person and see why they may be feeling the way they do. Don’t be surprised if their first reaction is one of denial or to say you are imagining things. Some people are not aware of how their jealousy manifests itself so let them know what you hear from them and how it makes you feel, using “I” statements like “when I hear you react this way, it makes me feel…”

Find out it they are going through a rough patch or if you managed to ignore or brush past their last success. Let them know how important your friendship is to you and see if you can both make a conscious effort to be more supportive and celebrate each others good news as if it was your own.

Letting Go: It may seem hard but you’ll feel better after. Just let go of whatever you’re jealous of.

Make a list of things that you’re grateful for: This will make you feel better.

Go observe nature in silence: Observe the birds, ducks, geese, trees, flowers, and leaves in silence.

Practice doing mindfulness daily: This is not needed for jealousy but you should do it every day.

I found this gorgeous parrot on Google Images

Hope you enjoyed this week’s edition of Emotions With Animals! Check in next Friday to read the next edition of Emotions With Animals. Don’t forget to visit Camilla’s website!

Subscribe to Lillian Darnell by Email

Emotions With Animals: Angry Ducks

Hey there, everyone! Welcome back to Emotions With Animals. This week’s emotion is Anger. I also have recently wrote A Sad Princess StoryEmotions WIth Animals: Sad CatsA Happy FairyHappy DogsA Mindful Mermaid Story, and Mindful Goslings if you haven’t seen these blog posts yet. Thank you for everyone who has visited these linked blog posts!

Angry ducks hiss and beat nearby ducks. Angry ducks can fight like people. Angry ducks are similar to people.

Angry people have meltdowns. Angry people have arguments. Angry people also hiss. Angry people beat other people and objects.

Here are some ways to stop anger:

Separate emotion and action: It’s easier to get rid of the anger when you separate those emotions and actions. You might feel a little better when you do this.

Do Some Exercises: This will cool yourself down when angry. It will also help your body stay healthy and strong.

Delay your Reaction: This will help you get centered again. Inhale deeply and as you exhale, count to ten or repeat a phrase that helps you relax several times.

Distract Yourself: Read a good book that will make you feel happy, watch a movie that will make you smile or feel good, and think of a good memory. You could also try painting, drawing, writing, and more!

Discuss Your Anger With Someone You Trust: This might make you feel better. It could be a family member, friend, or someone you play or work with. The person you talk to may have experienced it themselves.

Listen to Music: Listening to the music may help you feel better. Listen to aggressive music that matches your mood allows you to work through the emotion productively. Listen to slower music (such as acoustic or Hawaiian music) allows you to slow your thought process and calm down.

Write a E-Mail To Yourself: I know it might sound silly but it will help you feel a lot lighter once your done. Write out your anger and then continue to revise the e-mail as you think of new things you would’ve liked to say at the time.

Get everything out of your system about the issue on your own time, as the words come to you. Once you have nothing more to say and you’ve perfected the e-mail.  Go delete the email. Use erasing the e-mail as a symbolic gesture toward letting go of what’s bothering you.

Disconnect from Your Triggers

Watch a Funny Show/Movie: See the Distract Yourself to see info on this section.

Accept and Know: It’s okay to feel angry and be angry.

Focus: Where do you feel the anger in your body? How does it feel? Does it feel tight, painful, or tight.  Focus on all of that. Eventually, it should go away. Of course, if it’s your first few times it may not work for you because it takes practice.

Do something: Take few deep breaths, look at a flower, look at a tree, look at birds, or go for a walk.

Don’t say judgemental things About Anger: You’ll feel better after you have done this.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this blog post. See you next time at Emotions With Animals!

Cute Angry Duck. Doesn’t it look adorable?

 

Happy Dogs

Hey, there! I recently wrote Mindful Goslings and if you want to, check the linked blog post out. I also wrote A Mindful Mermaid Story if you also want to check it out. This post is to show some people to be kind, happy, and fun. It’s also to get some fun facts and info.

Happy dogs like to lick you and smell you. Dogs also like to wag their tail when they like you. The dogs also try to cheer you up too.

People are more harder to be happy because they don’t accept looking in the current moment instead of the past or future. When they’re happy, the people seem more cheerful. Here’s some suggestions on how to be happier:

Do a grateful exercise: Gratefulness brings the attention away from distress and other opposites of happy. It brings the attention forward to happiness.

Stop looking for happiness: Realize it is in you already.

Learn To Connect With And Accept Emotion: Here’s how to connect with and accept emotions. Say to yourself repeatedly, I accept emotions. While saying that, ask yourself where you feel that emotion and focus and breathe in that area.

Learn And Practice Mindfulness: Going out in nature can help you learn and practice mindfulness. Check my blogpost about mindful goslings to find out more about how you can be mindful.

Meditation: Meditate every day. If you want, do some intense meditation. Otherwise, stick with easy or moderate meditation.

I got this photo from Google Images.

I got this photo from Google Images.

Check out Camilla’s website called Mindful Musings if you want to find out more useful info. Keep in mind that I post Emotions With Animals every Friday for now if you want to check in with emotions.

Subscribe to Lillian Darnell by Email

Instagram Update from Winter 2015 to Spring 2016

Hey, everyone! Here’s the newest Instagram update from this winter to this spring. Enjoy this Instagram update!

“Beautiful days bring precious times outdoors.” – Lillian

20160417-163012.jpg

20160417-163634.jpg

20160417-163657.jpg

20160417-163712.jpg

20160417-163738.jpg

20160417-163805.jpg

20160417-163821.jpg

20160417-163835.jpg

20160417-163851.jpg

20160417-163906.jpg

A Friendly Letter To Robert Frost

Hi there! I am typing a friendly letter to Robert Frost who has past away. I’m doing this for fun. Below is where it begins.

Hey there, Robert Frost!

I had no idea that you live in New Hampshire. I loved your winter poems and some of the other poems you wrote. I hope you love New Hampshire! I’ve heard it’s beautiful there!

I like poetry and I know you like reading because you are technically an author. Take your time to read this. Enjoy a nice day!

Best wishes,

Lillian

P.S. My family says hello.

Thanks for reading this friendly letter!

Latest News: Research on Forgiveness

Hi there! Camilla assigned to me to do research on forgiveness and apologies last week and I just finished it. I worked on it really hard and it begins below.

Here’s the definition for apology:

An apology tells someone that we’re sorry for what we did even if we mean it on purpose. It’s a way of saying we’re aware of what we did and we’ll try to do better in the future. Here’s why apologizing is important: Apologies are one of the tools we use to build good friendships and relationships. When someone says “I’m sorry” (and really mean it), it’s because you would probably feel bad or guilty
that something you did or said hurt or harmed someone.

Saying you’re sorry is
more than just words. You’re also saying that you respect the other
person and you care about his or her feelings. Apologizing shows you have empathy. After apologizing, you might feel a little better.

The other person probably will, too. When you apologize in a caring way, you can feel good because you are trying to make things right again. Everyone needs to apologize (even adults) when they do something wrong. By doing the right thing and saying “I’m sorry,” parents and other adults set an example.

That example is how kids and teenagers learn to apologize when they absolutely need to. When someone apologizes to you, you may welcome it and be ready to forgive whatever happened and move on or you might not feel like being friendly again right away. If a person keeps hurting you and apologizing without making an effort to change, you might not want to hang out with that person anymore. Apologies and forgiveness are important because intractable conflicts generate such deep and searing emotions.

Even after the fighting stops, people still feel the pain, hurt, anger, fear, and hatred that produced the conflict and its horrors in the first place. Without apology and forgiveness, people remain locked in the value systems that produced the conflict. Little progress beyond a ceasefire can be made. For some people, apologizing feels like an admission that they are inadequate–that, rather than having made a mistake, there is something inherently wrong with them.

Some people believe that offering the first apology after an argument is an admission of guilt and responsibility for the entirety of a conflict that involved wrongs on the part of both parties; they think an apology from them will allow the other person to take no responsibility for their own part in the conflict. Sometimes an apology seems to call added attention to a mistake that may have gone unnoticed. However, in the right circumstances, a well-delivered, appropriately sincere apology will generally avoid all of these issues, and will merely serve to usher in a resolution, reaffirm shared values, and restore positive feelings. You just have to know when and how to deliver your apology.

You can hurt yourself by hitting, sore throat or falling when you have a meltdown. The each culture or person has its own language. This is how Spanish people say sorry: ¡Lo Siento! This is how Russian people say sorry: Prastite/Izvinite Простите/ Извините

This is how Vietnamese people say sorry: Xin lỗi! Forgiveness, as you may have heard or experienced, is simply the act of letting go of the burden that you carry from another person who has hurt you out of their own pain, ignorance, or confusion. It’s a practice of freeing up your energy to focus on things that incline toward your own health and well-being or the health and well-being of others. There’s a saying: “Not forgiving is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to get hurt or die.”

The reality is holding onto resentment literally keeps our cortisol running and makes us sick. The wonderful thing about forgiveness is it really only takes one to tango. You only need one person to forgive—you! You don’t even need the offender.

Right now, if you have someone you’re holding a grudge against or are resenting, imagine the two of you tied together in a tug of war and imagine the cord being cut…you no longer have the tension of the rope, you are free! Of course it’s not often this easy and it’s a practice to forgive, but what else is there to do? Hold onto the resentment so we continue to suffer? We’ve already been hurt, why continue to inflict further suffering on ourselves?

“Forgiveness does not change the past, but it does enlarge the future.”—Paul Boese If you are open to letting go of the resentment-habit and opening up to a better future, play with the following short forgiveness practice from The Now Effect: Allow this to be a choice point to practice forgiveness. Think of someone who has hurt you or caused you pain (maybe not the person who has hurt you most) whom you are holding a grudge against right now. Visualize the time you had been hurt by this person and feel the pain you still carry.

Hold tightly to your unwillingness to forgive. Now observe what emotion you are feeling. Is it anger, resentment, sadness? Also use your body as a barometer and notice physically what you feel.

Are you tense anywhere or feeling heavy? Now bring awareness to your thoughts; are they hateful, spiteful thoughts? Feel this burden that lives inside when you hold so tightly to past hurts. Now ask yourself, “Who is suffering?

Have I carried this burden long enough? Am I willing to forgive?” If not, that is okay, perhaps the time will come when you’re ready. If you are ready, practice “Breathing in, I acknowledge the pain, breathing out, forgiving and releasing this burden from my heart and mind.”

Continue this as long as it is supportive to you. Remind yourself that it takes courage to forgive and so allow this to be a part of your new story. Sometime’s it hard to break out of the habit of not apologizing and it’s easy to get into the habit of not apologizing. Here’s 2 illustrations below this sentence.

20150518-120821.jpg

20150518-121552.jpg

Sources I Used:

http://m.kidshealth.org/teen/school_jobs/good_friends/apologies.html#a_Does_Apologizing_Fix_Everything_

http://mobile.linguanaut.com/?url=http%253A%252F%252Fwww.linguanaut.com%252Fenglish_russian.htm&dm_redirected=true%232903

http://www.mindful.org/mindful-voices/on-mental-health/learn-to-forgive-others-no-matter-what

http://www.beyondintractability.org/essay/apology-forgiveness

Subscribe to Lillian Darnell by Email